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“What is old is new again” May Be the Most Surprising Trend in Marketing in 2019

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Believe it or not, we have once again come full circle on another year. Marketing prognosticators are polishing their crystal balls of future things to come and declaring how technology will revolutionize our channels of communication with consumers in 2019.  Last year’s predicted trends are being measured against reality, and the process is becoming akin to scoring a competitive game of sport.

As with so many games in life the results of our collective efforts to predict the future of marketing tactics and activities are never completely aligned with perfection. Shifting consumer expectations and the response to accepting new communication technologies make the playing field difficult to read and an unsuited environment for calling a perfect game. All we can really do is take stock of what is working, evaluate why some predictions failed, make necessary adjustments to the strategy for 2019 and move forward. The most successful predictions of marketing in 2018 appeared to be offered by those who envisioned a broader and less specific set of outcomes.

“While some industries have embraced the paradigm shift in how they reach, engage, and mobilize new customers, I predict that we will see even more attention and focus being placed on getting the marketing mix correct,” predicted Julie Gareleck, CEO & Managing Partner, Junction Creative Solutions. The year’s performance appears to have been another example that absolutes and inevitabilities rarely pan out. So what appears likely to work best in 2019?

Video Marketing’s performance will continue to align with the previously predicted game plan. A Cisco forecast indicates that video will make up 85% of Internet traffic by 2020. While posts with digital images and content continue to capture a significant audience, video is generating 135% more organic reach for marketers. Once seen as an opportunity for only the most well-healed, larger players, video is becoming more economical for those smaller marketers who can benefit from projecting an emotional and appealing story. According to The Wall Street Journal, “the usage of online video has increased by 10 times between 2011 and 2016. Over the next two years, the trend has only intensified and is unlikely to slow down.”

Automating the marketing process to work more efficiently and smarter will continue to pay dividends of better understanding customers.  Scott Brinker, Founder of Chief MarTec, said, “As much amazing marketing software as there is today, there is still an opportunity for new ideas. Marketing should be — and can be — better.”  Automation will be seen as another set of marketing tools that enhances the acquisition of new customers.

Smart marketers will continue to develop an expanded inbound approach to connecting with their market segments. Content marketing, automation, social media and multichannel marketing can be coordinated to create a brand reputation that is authentic and valuable to customers. Consumers are more often placing trust in those they know. Quality, reputable content will prevail over stock ads in the coming year. If one were to bet on an absolute, a continuing utilization of inbound marketing tactics is a wise wager for 2019.

Once predicted to be rendered obsolete; direct mail, print advertising and brick and mortar sellers are showing some unexpected resilience in the digital age. Not unlike wax LP’s return to popularity among a niche market of music lovers in a world of digital recordings, old school marketing tactics are finding success with consumers who are tired of the incessant barrage of digital media noise and those who long to revisit a traditional physical shopping experience. Players on the field of brick and mortar will need to focus on creating entertaining events and an enticing experience for their target markets.

Who would have thought it: consumers like getting mail, even if it was once thought to be junk? Print advertising is not dead. While a small and much diminished portion of overall marketing spend, print is finding its rightful place in the digital world. In the field of marketing where a fast, bang, digital technology appears to arise every minute, the most surprising trend in marketing for 2019 may just be “what is old is new again.”

Prepare Your eCommerce Website for a Happy Holiday Selling Season

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Would a winning team come to the plate in the World Series expecting to win without their best equipment? The answer from most sports enthusiasts and players alike would be, “certainly not!” But retailers and sellers across the industry spectrum may be coming to the plate in the biggest game of the year woefully unprepared for a big win. The holiday season is marketers’ most important opportunity to win big or go home, yet many players are failing to adequately coordinate ecommerce outlets for victory.

This year, online sales have risen by 46% and with more than 60 percent of retailers showing inventory on their website, it is critical to be ready for all the increased holiday shopping ahead. For a website to be most effective it must be aesthetically relevant, be at the peak of its performance and timely in its content. The worst time to realize that your marketing hardware isn’t loaded properly is when you have competition within your sight. Now is the time to focus on improving the performance of your website’s existing functionality.

First and foremost, your website must be prepared to handle and respond to the increased amount of traffic that is experienced around the holiday season. With their busy schedules consumers are impatient with websites that are slow to function and deliver accurately on their commands. Studies have revealed that websites that fail to load in just three seconds produce increased bounce rates. It is time to test your server’s ability to respond to your customers’ expectations and take measures to improve the site’s performance.

Decorating brick and mortar stores for the busiest selling season is a holiday tradition. Retailers spend millions of dollars each year in an attempt to set a festive mood in hopes of encouraging shoppers to spend with them. A website should be no different. Decorating your site with the sounds and sights of the season will generate consumer interest and appeal. Offer something dynamic and unique with your content and modify it often to accommodate special events and promote shopping incentives. Utilize plug-ins that automate the processes of timely scheduling and initiating content modification. Focus on intently delivering on your promises. A gift received the day after Christmas is a memory rarely forgotten.

“In today’s world, if you’re not on mobile, you don’t exist.” More consumers look to mobile devices to research products and services before making a purchasing decision.  By 2021, it has been estimated that consumers will spend $152 billion directly on mobile phones, and over the next few years mobile phones will influence $1.4 trillion in offline sales. A strategy to align your online presence across all mobile devices is critical.

Secure your website! Loyal customers may forgive an occasional mistake or inconvenience caused by unforeseen and uncontrollable calamity, but mess up a financial transaction or mishandle consumer data and you may be forever unforgiven. The holiday selling season brings out the best in many people, but it also brings out bad actors in greater numbers who are willing to victimize your customers and your business to advance their personal gain. Ensure that all your software, plug-ins, connections and passwords are up to date, and invest in the latest versions of anti-malware as a first line of defense.

Prepare your eCommerce platform now for a happy holiday selling season!

Instagram Can be a Powerful Tool in Your Marketing Arsenal

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Launched in 2010, Instagram continues to grow at a remarkable pace. Just a little more than 7 years of age, the visual social media platform has surpassed 800 million monthly users and is not only attracting individual social conversations but is proving its worthiness to marketers looking to grow their brand’s awareness and showcase its products. With 51 percent of users indicating that they visit the site daily and 70 percent using the platform to search brands, Instagram has become a friendly, authentic method to connect with potential consumers. With ninety percent visual content, standing out in the crowd of 800 million users can be a daunting task for marketing professionals accustomed to relying on wordsmithing skills to get their message across. But the mostly wordless approach is becoming one of the most effective social media networks.

Generating increased brand awareness and building customer loyalty to drive increased sales requires a defined strategy based on consumer demographics, behaviors and identifying key motivations to purchase. “Logic persuades but feelings motivate, influencing a customer’s intention to purchase over anything else. According to a study, purely emotional campaigns were twice as likely to generate profit gains then those with a rational approach.”

It shouldn’t be a surprise that great content is at the core of a great social media campaign. With Instagram, building a great message is all about building a visual narrative where limited prose reflects and validates the image. While it is tempting to fall back on the tried and true adage, “a picture is worth a thousand words”, it is also true that most marketers struggle to communicate in a visual medium. Success with Instagram is derived from generating engaging content. The process begins with learning as much as possible about the medium, how customers are using the platform and understanding how the competition is succeeding in the space.

Create an expansive collection of unique content around a common theme and your desired persona. Be prepared to make adjustments, but be consistent with the message. Be creative but focused and invest in visual editing tools and experienced professional skill-sets when necessary. Engage socially with users and influencers who have already built a trusting relationship with their followers to better understand what is driving them to be interested in your brand. Use memorable and engaging hashtags and be sure to include a link to your website. Invite fellow users to share your content. Don’t miss an opportunity to call for action. Establish a set of reliable metrics to measure and frequently test your efforts’ performance.

Instagram can be a powerful tool in your marketing arsenal, but with all the potential benefits comes some risks. In a hyper-sensitive, socially correct landscape, creativity can often lead to misinterpretation. As with all social website platforms, care should be taken to avoid turning a positive message into a plethora of negative responses.

According to Instagram, 75% of users who see a business post take action. It is a medium that promises to continue to grow in size and effectiveness. Be prepared to adapt to changing trends.  Take advantage of new tools and features that create opportunities to interface with an ever expanding Instagram community, and resolve not to fall behind your competition.

How the GDPR Implementation is Impacting Marketers’ Relationship with Consumers

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Since its passage in May 2016, the European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has resulted in many companies questioning the need to comply or what the far-reaching regulation would mean to their organizations. Initially many firms failed to understand the global reach of the regulation and that they would be required to respond to the demands of the rule. The GDPR creates strict requirements on how companies who collect, maintain and market consumers’ data must handle the use of that data. The regulation, which comes with severe financial penalties and liabilities when breached, went into effect in May of this year.

Under Article 4 of the GDPR, “any consent to the processing of data must be freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous.” Data subjects need to voluntarily submit data for processing. Consent should be guided by a clear, plain English explanation of what specific processing will be done, why its collection is necessary and who the data is shared with. If there will be multiple processes, consent is required for each. At the outset, many predicted that the sweeping regulations would be the end of marketing as it is generally practiced, particularly digital marketing, but many others believed that the new regulatory environment would simply rid the marketing landscape of poor marketing practices and less-than-honest practitioners.

While migration to the GDPR requirements have been a challenge, progress has been made for companies who recognized the importance of compliance. Now four months into the launch, major changes among marketing professionals have occurred. Previous conduct of buying email lists, pre-ticked consent boxes and convoluted terms and conditions are becoming activities of the past. So how do consumers, or subjects as they are known in the EU, feel about the new data handling regulations?

A survey commissioned by Marketing Week and performed by Toluna, indicates that 57% of people feel
that they better understand how companies are using their data, but merely 27% of respondents feel that the overall experience with brands is better. “Most people (65%) believe GDPR has made no difference at all, while 8% suggest things have actually got worse.” With more than half of the respondents indicating that the GDPR has had no impact on them it may be that many consumers do not even know about the GDPR standards and what benefits the new rules may play in their digital lives.

Perhaps it is too early to effectively measure the impact of GDPR on companies’ marketing tactics or how consumers perceive brands’ handling and use of personal data. With a proliferation of media accounts of how some major organizations have mishandled customer data and trust in the past, well entrenched attitudes prevail. The GDPR is capable of having a positive impact on the consumer/marketer relationship for those organizations that embrace the opportunity. Only time will reveal the effectiveness of the best of intentions to resolve the past bad acts of data management.

Finally, the Season of Profitability and Promise is Upon Us

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Unlike the biggest shopping season of the year, the second busiest doesn’t enjoy the same prominence or experience the same anticipation from consumers, unless of course you are a summertime-weary parent. Back to school shopping is the second largest selling opportunity for retailers and it is expected to generate more than $82.8 billion is sales for retailers of clothing, pencils, backpacks and pencils this year. While the final results are still ringing up, consumers are off to the stores and virtual markets all across the country and the keyboard. This year more than half of parents are planning on increasing their “get them out of the house and back to school” spend.

More than 57 percent of the shopping will be at local brick and mortar stores with online sales gaining ground. This year, approximately $6.3 billion will be spent online for school supplies, clothing, and technology. With the shopping beginning in early June, marketers were eager to end up in first place, with more than 90 percent of them offering deep discounts and money saving coupons to consumers from pre-school to graduate school students.

Retailers are following performance data from 2017 and reaching out to the estimated 55 percent of parents who use smart devices to find the best deals. Experienced marketing-savvy sellers are approaching the season’s tasks through omnichannel campaigns. While nearly 55 percent of the consumers will buy early, nearly half of them will extend their buying opportunities past the start of the school opening classes. The National Retail Federation’s (NRF) CEO, Matthew Shay, says he expects “a very strong season,” due to growing consumer confidence. For each of their students, parents are expected to spend $236.90 on clothing, $187.10 on electronics, $136.66 on shoes and $122.13 on school supplies. Shay went on to say, “There’s still more shopping to do, and regardless of timing, the economy is healthy and shoppers are confident and willing to spend.”

Compared to the Christmas holiday experience, retailers are backing off on their once massive spend for the back to school season. “It’s not that retailers are spending less on advertising overall,” says Jon Swallen, chief research officer at Kantar Media, “or that back-to-school still isn’t an important part of their calendar. It’s just that they are not investing as heavily in dedicated back-to-school messaging.” It appears retailers are attempting get more bang for each buck during a time when consumers are already spending for clothing and other items that also relate to back to school purchases.

Overall, marketing spending is still focused on using TV and digital media first, followed by paid search. Regardless of the size and method of the campaigns, retailers are excited about entering the time of the year when they emerge from months of red ink into a period of profitability and promise.

What’s Going on in the Minds and Households of the Millennial Generation?

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Much has been said about Millennials, their character traits, work ethic, shopping habits, methods of communication and just about any other imaginable fundamental behavior, and not all the comments have been positive or flattering. The millennial generation usually identifies those born between 1981 and 1996. Arriving in the era of massive technological advances, they have come of age being familiar with the internet, smart digital devices, social media platforms, and all the other technology that often baffles former generations.

Millennials are extremely tech savvy, highly educated and are on the verge of becoming the largest living generation. Learning how to market effectively to them is not an option for marketers and absolutely essential to surviving in the coming decade. “We don’t think of them as special or different any more. They are the core of our business,” says Alan Jope, president of beauty and personal care at Unilever. While some marketers can at least claim a little success in cracking the millennial code, others have just given up and returned to re-focus on what worked to attract consumers in the past. Customer behavior is changing almost daily as technology advances its influence over how consumers make buying decisions.

Grouping an entire generation of people into a single marketing demographic will not work. Like all market segments, not all Millennials will respond to the same messaging and most are fed up with traditional methods of advertising. According to a study from the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, millennials have filtered out advertising on social media and turned to other reference points. Titled, “Born and Raised in the Age of Technology,” the study states, “Millennials consume information when and how they want to.” A campaign of one size fits all is a likely pathway to failure. Erik Huberman, Founder & CEO of Hawke Media says, “Certainly, you’ll want to target age demographics to a certain extent, but your targeting should also be more granular. Instead, go right to the actual attributes of the real customer.”

Quality content across multiple mobile devices is essential to attracting members of this new power generation. An Animoto study has found that 80 percent of surveyed Millennials use videos to conduct research before making a purchase. Video is no longer an option for marketers looking to attract these consumers’ interest. Some 39% of Millennials post reviews of products or brands on social media outlets, and this generation is more likely to listen to and connect with people like them rather than celebrities. Over 60% of millennials would try a product suggested by a YouTuber. Social media reigns supreme.

A select group of analysts was recently impaneled by NPD, in an effort to find out what’s going on inside the minds and households of consumers born between 1981 and 1996. Their insights revealed a group of consumers markedly different from their parents. Millennials tend to be retail explorers, more interested in making memories than acquiring things. They tend to appreciate function over price and often feel less is more. They enjoy experiencing activities more then owning stuff and are inclined to be more focused on home activities. Arguably the group is recognized as being a bit more self-centered then previous generations of consumers. Matt Powell, Vice President, Senior Industry Advisor, Sports, says: “Millennials are constantly interviewing brands, meaning that a brand has to prove itself, every day. For Boomers, there were fewer shopping choices, shopping outlets, and sources of product information. For Millennials, those elements are infinite. On top of that, these elements are always available on their smartphones.”

Fully understanding these shifts in consumer behaviors and beliefs will help unlock fresh insights to drive a business forward. The traditional marketing and sales approach used to create “target audiences” based on a profile of gender, age, demographic, or geographic data alone is an approach that will cripple a business’s ability to successfully reach target audiences in an effective way.

The Most Important Marketing Content is Video

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It is interesting that the more that fundamentals of just about everything change with time and technology, the more so many well-established truisms remain the same.  The era of content being king in marketing is giving way to a new visual medium, a rerun of the progression from printed media advertising to television more than a half century ago. Despite all the dramatic shifts in the methods of communications over time, a picture is still worth a thousand words.

Today the most important  content marketing is video. Regardless of the platform; Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat or YouTube, video has become an essential part of any organization’s overall marketing strategy. Video seems to be adding value to the customer’s content experience. When both video and text are available on the same page, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service, and 85% of consumers indicate that they prefer to see more video from brands in the coming year. With such positive response from consumers, brands are responding by increasing video participation.

With 81% of businesses utilizing video in marketing campaigns (up from 63% just a year ago), 99% of those predict they will continue to use the medium in the future. Clearly content alone is being dethroned. Video is here to stay and marketers should embrace the change. The medium brings with it more opportunity for brands to be creative in their messaging. As with content alone, quality trumps quantity.

With four distinctive platforms available, videos can be created to take advantage of each platform’s unique targeting capabilities. Whatever the goal of the video, it should be defined at the outset of the process and be used to tailor a particular strategy. Consumers are becoming increasingly selective about the content they consume, so it is important to develop videos that are educational and entertaining.

The cost of producing a single video can range from $1,000 to $10,000 depending upon the level of complexity and professionalism of the production, but with 64% of consumers more likely to make a purchase after watching a video and with the potential of reaching millions of viewers with one single video, the cost is justified.

For more on how video can impact your brand’s awareness and its importance in an effective content marketing strategy, contact Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) at   678-686-1125.

Overcoming the Challenges of Succeeding in Business

 

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“The most admirable benefit to being self-employed is having the freedom to select which 80 hours to work each week.” For those unaccustomed to the realities of becoming an entrepreneur, the most common misconception is that with the ability to cut ties with regular paychecks from an employer comes freedom from the commands of another. In reality those who choose to step out from the pack and start a new business are trading one demanding 40-hour work week for an all-consuming lifestyle that is full of daunting challenges and surrounded by seemingly endless numbers of foes bent on stealing the dream.  According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, over 50% of small businesses fail in the first year and 95% fail within the first five years. So, with that statistic in mind; what is wrong with all the small business people out there?

Obviously, the challenges to achievement of success in business are many, formidable and often complex. Financing, marketing, administrative tasks and acquiring needed talent just to name a few. Most say that the leading hurdle in running a business is the demand of time. Small business ownership is generally a lonely journey, particularly in the beginning. Nearly a quarter of all small business owners feel that having enough time to get everything done each day is their most formidable barrier to formulating the long-term strategies necessary to succeed. The Small Business Growth Index found that 65 percent of small business owners believe technology innovations are making it easier to streamline business operations.

Fortunately, the technology that is providing large businesses significant competitive advantages in the marketplace is also providing endless opportunities for small businesses to automate routine and redundant everyday activities, permitting much needed time for owners to focus on long-term goals and objectives without sacrificing quality performance. Developing a reasonable and achievable plan and working the plan has never been more important to achieving success in business.

While 95 percent of all business owners admit to performing their own marketing, less than half identify themselves as being “marketing savvy.” The universe of marketing is experiencing a revolution. The Internet, social media platforms, mobile devices and an increasingly expanding range of digital technology is providing a plethora of new vehicles to connect with consumers. Selecting an affordable mix of marketing collateral that project your unique business proposition to your targeted customer requires time and an understanding of what vehicle will best suit your particular business needs. With most small businesses unable to afford in-house marketing professionals, outsourcing the marketing function to experienced marketing professionals can have an immediate positive impact on a small business.

Attracting and selecting qualified employees is perhaps the most challenging of all tasks facing small businesses today. Identifying and onboarding the talent needed to establish and grow a sustainable business is paramount to success. Filling a need for individuals who share your passion for achieving the vision, who mirror the company culture and who can bring valuable insight, skill and effort to the journey is difficult and time consuming but is essential to earning a place in the 5 percent club.

Each year there are more than 600,000 new businesses opened by people who, as statistics suggest, have something wrong with them. The reasons given by those who choose to establish a small business is varied. Some profess a need to command their own destiny or are compelled by a need fulfill a personal passion. Some relish the immensity of the challenge and still others are attracted to the game of risk and reward. The reasons, perhaps, are as many as the challenges to be overcome.

For more on how Junction Creative Solutions’ (Junction) experienced marketing professionals and business development experts can help you overcome the many small business challenges, call 678-686-1125.

Data Centricity Becoming a Key Objective for Organizations

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The data generated and collected from smart devices, laptops, wearables and even consumer appliances is mounting. The volume of data collected is outpacing organizations’ ability to timely evaluate, measure and react effectively. Organizations are struggling to gain optimal, efficient results that permit them to take effective advantage of critical opportunities. Fractured data, collected from numerous silos, can impact a company’s ability to respond to consumer trends and can result in inefficiencies in delivering consistent brand messaging across marketing channels.

A recent study conducted by the Winterberry Group entitled “The Data-Centric Organization 2018” found that marketing media and commerce are becoming more focused on centralizing marketing data functions to take full advantage of efficiencies in campaigns and cost. According to McKinsey & Company, centralized marketing analytics will save 15-30% of an organization’s marketing budget.

Centralization of data collection and management can reduce reporting times by 80-90 percent and may result in a more consistent stream of reporting. A centralized approach will eliminate unnecessary task-oriented labor and will provide more time for marketing professionals to focus on creative and strategic functions, leading to more effective and responsive campaigns. According to the Winterberry Group study, data centricity will improve team collaboration, more effectively direct segmentation and result in better brand messaging.  In organizations where marketing is identified as a cost center, return on investment (ROI) will be more easily measured.

Achieving centralized marketing data allows a company to take advantage of technology and create additional opportunities to grow the business. “Nearly 50% of the marketers, publishers and tech developers in North America surveyed by Winterberry Group in 2017 said that centralizing ownership of data would be one of the most important changes that their organization could make to derive value from their data.”

“Centralizing data ownership has been a big focus as advertisers take programmatic and data management contracts in-house to gain a complete view of their consumer,” said David Lee, programmatic group lead at ad agency The Richards Group. “This has allowed clients to see where the gaps in their data are.”

With programmatic advertising predicted to account for the majority of advertising spend by the end of this year, taking ownership and streamlining data management has become a key objective for organizations across the industry spectrum.

Advertisers are Rushing to Assure Brand Safety

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For marketers it seemed like a gift from the technology gods. Digital marketing, the limitless opportunity to reach out and connect with infinite numbers of potential customers and grab their undivided attention to your messages where they live, shop, walk, play or relax. Never having to worry about printed media’s shelf life, missed delivered copies of the daily news bugle, mass distributed mailings or consumers planning their trips to the refrigerator during commercial breaks.

For a relatively paltry few cents per touch point, sellers can connect with a customer through smart phones, pads, desktops, laptops, wearable or even home appliances. By gathering up all the subsequent data, sellers can learn what the consumer bought, how and where they bought it, and potentially how much the customer earns, how many kids live with them in their single parent, multi-parent or no parent household, and how they were about to act. Digital marketing was promising an end to a consumer’s ability to escape the messaging even for an unobtrusive bathroom break. What could possibly go wrong with this new-found advertising utopia?

In a time where ultra-sensitivity prevails around every expressed comment, public position, personal opinion or mutual association, the answer has been revealed: plenty. With 37% of consumers saying their perception of a brand is altered when they see ads placed alongside offensive content, marketers are learning that just one misplaced advertisement can result in serious damage to the brand’s image and value. With major social media channels falling victim to careless handling of user data and insensitivity to accepting offensive content, marketers are rethinking the investment in many digital platforms. Major advertisers are responding to the threat by establishing policies that eliminate investment in platforms or environments that do not protect children or that create division in society or promote anger or hate.

Research indicates that 77 percent of brand marketers are convinced that failing to address brand safety directly impacts return on investment (ROI), leading a staggering 91% of digital marketers to implement or plan brand-safe strategies. Many of the world’s biggest advertisers are learning just how little control they have over their brands once they’ve been released into the digital media environment. James Londal, chief data officer at Hearts & Science says, “We want our adverts to appear in the best place. We need to have greater control over where ads appear, regardless of the platform. We need to have a certain standard of quality on the content. Platforms need to ensure the quality level is maintained.”

Facebook, Twitter and other digital platforms are finding themselves behind a learning curve and scrambling to undo the damage to advertisers’ brands and their own bottom lines. Regaining advertisers’ trust and confidence in the digital marketing chain is not likely to be quick. Some digital competitors are exploiting the problem by promising to fix internal failings and offering more advertiser control of ad placements. The solution may not lie only with the platforms and purveyors of digital media but with the industry as a whole. “I think that marketing as an industry needs to take a good look at itself and really question: am I truly, truly, truly a competitive value proposition such that I am a provider to the industry?” says, Andy Main, head of Deloitte Digital, told Marketing Dive. “A lot of it hasn’t been reinvented for decades and people are running out of juice on old business models that are so antiquated that people are just running away from them.”

Advertisers must reevaluate the level of the marketing department’s involvement in protecting the brand from association with offensive and damaging social commentary. Social responsibility has become an important part of a company’s overall marketing strategy. Being recognized as supporting universally accepted social issues can add significant brand value in an increasingly socially conscious market. In the new world of commerce, our grandfather’s lament to never speaking of politics and religion in conducting business is no longer a tenantable position. However, in a society equally divided over micro social and political issues, our forebearer’s advice may still hold some measure of validity.

Contact us to learn more about the importance of Reputation Management and how Junction can assist in protecting your brand!