Posts

A Little Mystery and Intrigue Accompanies Apple Card Introduction

Image credit:Satori Studios/Shutterstock.com

Flashy introductions touting world shattering, high-tech, gee whiz, holy cow demonstrations of almost magical performance have been the typical approach of Apple when revealing their newest products. The flash of the reveal has consistently been trumped only by loyal consumers’ responses. The recent introduction of Apple’s foray into the financial services sector was expected to be received with the typical enthusiasm awarded to past product introductions, but the initial response has fallen short of expectations. Perhaps it is the usual, ho-hum response typically afforded product introductions from the financial industry. Let’s face it, financial products generally are not described as sexy and disruptive.

Apple’s long-awaited introduction of the “Apple Card” made its debut with the company’s usual flare and promise. The effort is a partnership with Goldman Sachs, who is making its first offering in the credit card world, and MasterCard. Apple Card is built into the Apple Wallet app on iPhone, offering customers a familiar experience with Apple Pay and the ability to manage their card right on iPhone. While Apple is playing up the card’s benefits of no annual or late fees, no over the limit fees or international surcharges, the card’s cash back features have been described as underwhelming by critics and early consumers. The interest rates, dependent upon a cardholder’s qualifications, appear to be in-line with the current financial industry’s best offerings. The card does not contain a credit card number, expiration date or CVV security code, instead featuring facial and touch identity capabilities. The card is tied to Apple Pay, a service that lets people load banking information and pay in store or use it for purchases online. It works globally where Apple Pay is accepted, lets users track spending in the Wallet app, and focuses on transaction privacy.

But the new offering may be destined to receive a similar response from consumers as Apple Pay. First introduced five years ago, Apple Pay has struggled to capture a modest two percent of the credit transaction market dominated by MasterCard and Visa.  “It’s just easier to use card payments,” said Harshita Rawat, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. “Mobile payments need to evolve their value proposition to get consumers to switch from their plastic card payments. This new offering Apple Card is a step towards that but it needs to evolve even further.” Apple appears to be banking on the new Apple Card and the “Z” generation to boost Apple Pay acceptance. Jeff Fromm, author of “Marketing to Gen Z” and a partner at agency Barkley, says, “Gen Z is going to ‘hashtag’ Apple love this card.”

Whether on a revolutionary or evolutionary path, the Apple Card is already having an impact on the established players in the credit card market. Competitors are investigating advantages like privacy protection, no card numbers and advanced security features. And while credit cards may not be sexy, there is a certain amount of cool factor to the Apple Card for all those loyal Apple fans. “Although the Apple card’s rewards aren’t too exciting, it might bring more value to its already loyal customers in the form of convenience and security,” says Jill Gonzalez, an analyst at finance site WalletHub. “When using the card via Apple Pay, users will quickly be able to see where and how they spend their money without the use of a third-party app.”

For Apple, the journey into a field less traveled and experienced contains more than a little mystery and intrigue. Will the brand’s magical touch of the past be repeated? It appears that even for a veteran like Apple, only time will tell.

Look Out! After Some Tweaking, Subscription Service Might Just Work Here

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Once the relatively sole purview of magazines, cable TV and book of the month clubs, subscription business models are now popping up all over. Software, once purchased and installed on one computer at a time and repurchased when a new version became available, is quickly being replaced by monthly subscriptions. Ownership of the product remains with the provider and access is subscribed to consumer users over time. The expansion of subscription service is being driven mainly by advances in technology where barriers to forming and maintaining ongoing consumer/marketer relationships are eased or eliminated.

For a monthly fee, consumers can now contract with providers for everything from personal care, fitness, movies and entertainment to financial services. Many believe that the larger market is seeing the beginning of the end of personal ownership. A McKinsey report found that the value of online subscriptions rose from $57 million in 2011 to $2.6 billion in 2016. While the subscription e-commerce market has grown by more than 100% percent a year over the past five years, the growth of the model has been accompanied by a significant amount of trial and error and as much pain as gain.

With subscription business models, revenue is generated from individual customers making recurring payments for continued access to a good or service over an extended period of time. The challenges to success are many, but matching customer demand for utilization with a price for the service is perhaps the most critical calculation. MoviePass, the subscription movie ticket upstart, paid each movie theaters’ full price for their subscribers’ tickets. The price was predicated on estimating how many times each month customers would utilize the service. When it was discovered that 15 % of customers were visiting theaters more than what was predicted each month, the difference between projections and reality resulted in a $147 million loss for the emerging business. Getting the price right is critical.    

If the price isn’t perceived by the consumer to be a good value then the service will fail to launch. However, set the price too low and sustainability and growth of the provider company will be elusive at best. Ultimately pricing should be flexible enough to respond to unanticipated volatility in demand and new competitive market entrants. Longer term pricing rates will provide opportunity to level market demand over time and give providers more time to form stronger connections with individual customers. Building strong, ongoing customer relationships are important to every business but are particularly critical to subscription services where referral from family and friends generates three to five times higher conversion rates than any other channel of marketing.

Subscription service, once thought to be nothing more than a threat to profit margins by many traditional business model executives, is finding converts even among the most skeptical. The trend appears to be gravitating towards each brand offering their own unique pricing plan rather than third party player offerings across multiple brands. The rate of acceptance and transition also is dependent upon the maturation of consumers, particularly among those who still find comfort in one-time payment for ownership. As the fine-tuning continues in delivery and more consumers cross the divide between traditional ownership to shared usership, it is likely that subscription services may just find their way into every imaginable type of product or service business. Just another case where fundamental market disruption results in the demise of the “it won’t work here” premise.

Carefully Managing Your Social Media Marketing Strategy Can Pay Big Dividends

Image credit: Rawoixel.com/Shutterstock.com

With more than half of the world’s population now using social media platforms to communicate, marketing via these platforms is no longer optional for brands looking to expand their reach. Ninety-five percent of adults between the ages of 18 and 34 years of age are most likely to follow brands via one or more social media outlets. Global penetration rates for mobile devices are exceeding 42 percent as nearly one-million new people each day use their mobile social media devices. With high return on investment (ROI), marketers are rapidly ramping up social media marketing spend. However, achieving long-term success with social media marketing requires building partnerships and relationships with prospective consumers. The process of identifying which platform performs the best for each product and service can be complex and expensive if not managed effectively.   

Roberto Blake, owner of digital agency Create Awesome Media believes brands need to understand how to translate the relationships they’ve built and the lessons they’ve learned using a platform into the larger platform ecosystem. As many of these social media networks mature, they focus more on a one-to-one “small group” connection with users. “People are realizing you don’t have to be super big; you can just have influence on a smaller group and have a wonderful business,” says Andrea Vahl. With a platform now available for nearly every demographic, social media marketing can no longer be ignored regardless of business size, but risk must be managed carefully in order to make the best use of content marketing spend.

Planning is at the forefront of any digital marketing strategy. Efficient and effective content must be timely and targeted to specific segments with messaging that builds brand recognition and drives sales. Having a calendar of content for each platform will greatly improve performance by having the right messages ready to go at the right time. Social media management tools from HubSpot, Buffer and HootSuite can be particularly useful. In general, Images still trump prose when communicating lengthy or complicated messages. Bite-sized chunks of information that are concise and to the point work better than lengthy script considering the audience’s usually short attention span and the fact that most conversations are taking place across mobile devices. Measure the effectiveness of the marketing plan and strategy on an ongoing basis and make necessary adjustments as necessary across all platforms.

Comprehensive management will take time but the rewards of a successful process can be considerable and very cost effective. If you don’t have the time or experienced staff to dedicate to the process, it can be beneficial in time and quality to form a working relationship with an outside social media specialist.

To learn more about how Junction Creative Solutions’ team of professionals and partners can help you create an impactful social media campaign to advance your brand reputation, call 678.686.1125 today.

Markets Where the Small and Few Can Succeed Among the Large and Many

Image credit: Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

Niche markets are quickly becoming popular opportunities for small to mid-sized companies looking to survive among large businesses. Specialized markets are not new. They have always had a place in the larger and broad-based markets that volume business models have historically been willing to overlook. Often considered too small to generate the required return on investment (ROI) usually courted by mega marketers, niche markets can be a haven of profitability for businesses willing to focus on the more fastidious consumer. Considerable success can be achieved by focusing on serving market segments that large competitors are unable or unwilling to serve. Niche markets exist across the entire spectrum of business and industry, consumer and business to business (B2B).

Targeting niche markets in eCommerce requires strong, comprehensive content in multiple formats and across multiple channels. Creating successful content requires attention to narrowly focused, high quality and in-depth messages that seek to capture the attention of the few, not the many. Because the target market may already possess a comprehensive understanding of the products and services they are seeking, authentic, knowledgeable and detailed content is critical. “To effectively appeal to an audience that’s already interested in your field, you’ll need to hire a team that’s capable of digging deep into that topic,” says Kenny Kline, Managing Partner at JAKK Media. “That means every member of your team should already possess a strong interest and knowledge in your chosen topic. This may require a shift in your approach to hiring.”

A strategy of attracting a loyal customer base over time will result in sustainable growth in market segments that often resemble closed communities where word of mouth between consumer members can make or break a player. Niche market websites need to be hyper-focused on narrow-niche keywords in order to stand out among the noise of the larger market players. “Most niche marketing websites use content to establish credibility, rank well in the search engines, and connect with visitors,” says Beeskow Blay. “Developing content, whether for the purposes of affiliate marketing or direct product sales, must be done in a way that delivers value to a niche audience. A deep understanding of, and interest in, your niche helps your message resonate with visitors and sets your brand above pitchy, shallow competitors.”

Niche market success demands authenticity. Losing focus and trying to be someone you are not will derail progress to sustainability. Understanding the intricacies of both the targeted consumer and the solutions they are seeking is vital to credibility. Faking it can be fatal. In a mega-marketing world where more often begets more, there exists a place where less equals more and where the small and few can outperform the large and the many.

Consumers Relearning Some Old Lessons with the Advent of Influencer Marketing

Image credit: Kaspars Grinvalds / Shutterstock.com

Influencer marketing, the technological equivalent to traditional word of mouth advertising, involves promoting products and services by celebrities and individuals who have influence over consumers’ purchase decisions. This influence typically comes from the actors’ expertise, popularity, or reputation. Consumers respond because they feel an affinity to the influencer and find them credible. Influencer is quickly becoming a profession category where genuine celebrities and self-made “stars”, who are famous for just being famous, are making a career of endorsing everything from beauty products to machine tools.

 With an estimated 800 million people actively using Instagram each month, in addition to other social media platforms, marketers are lining up to spend vast sums of money to connect their brands with consumers through these influencers. The medium is estimated to be worth more than $1.5 billion worldwide. The Association of National Advertisers has determined that 75 percent of marketers currently work with influencers in part due to the fact that the marketing tactic has 11 times the return on investment (ROI) of traditional digital marketing.

Some recent experiences though are having an impact on the new advertising medium. As with many shiny new things that produce nearly instant sizzle, influencer marketing is experiencing the consequences of fraud brought on by a lack of transparency. Reminiscent of the introductive days of television advertising, when pictures first married with prose to create visions of products and service performances that rivaled a snake-oil salesman pitch, social media advertising seems to be intent on rivaling the worst of these historic activities. Honesty, truth and transparency, most often portrayed as essential to effective advertising, are once again coming under fire, or is it Fyre?  Cynicism is quickly replacing much of the enthusiasm for celebrity word of mouth. Some critics are claiming that as much as 50 percent of influencer marketing industry performances are plagued by fraud.

Perhaps no better example of what can go wrong when famously famous people endorse an event without exercising responsible due diligence, is the now infamous Fyre Festival of 2017. Host Brian McFarland promoted an over the top, luxurious festival experience to launch his music booking mobile application. Famous celebrities lined up to accept as much as $250 thousand to advertise the promise of gourmet food, glamorous tents and villas, rock stars and a bevy of famous supermodels. Ticket buyers arrived to find the amenities woefully lacking and the promised performance stars and international models non-existent. Event attendees found themselves stranded on the far-away island of Great Exuma in the Bahamas. It was anything but an entertaining experience.

The failure was blamed on the promoter’s inability to launch an engagement, but in hindsight many consider the catastrophe nothing less than intentional fraud. With influencers receiving huge sums to promote the event, critics were quick to focus some of the responsibility on those influencers that failed to perform reasonable fact checking and investigation into the event promoter’s capabilities and credibility.

The industry was forced to initiate reforms following the debacle. Technological solutions are being implemented that will identify and recognize fake followings and fake engagements with the goal to separate fiction from reality. Harsher penalties are now in place for those who do not post the requisite full view notifications paid partnerships tags. The United Kingdom’s Advertising Standards Authority has warned hundreds of social media influencers to comply with stricter rules and to ensure that all sponsored or paid-for content is clearly labeled. Many people believe that the influencers involved with Fyre should be held accountable for helping market what ultimately became a failed event.

In the end, consumers bear a certain level of responsibility for their victimhood. For generations we were brought up to expect that; if it looks too good to be true it probably is; don’t believe everything you hear and though a picture can be worth a thousand words those words and the pictures may not be true. With the advent of software that can place someone where they have never been, saying things they have never said, this axiom deserves an increased amount of due diligence and scrutiny.

Despite all the amazing technological advances of the past decades, personal behavior, like fashion tends to repeat itself over time. Bad actors and criminal behavior are more often encouraged, not bounded by all the shiny new advances in digital communication. The former one to one approach to connecting with an expanding audience is being amplified by the internet’s “one to many” social media environment. Consumers are being forced to relearn some life lessons and are responding to the demise of influencer transparency and credibility in this new form of advertising. In a recent global survey of consumers, Nielsen found that 83% of consumers trust the recommendations of friends and family over other advertising influencers.

In 2019 successful brands will find a way to authentically utilize the expansive amount of customer content to more successfully connect their brands with consumers.

Securing a Website with an SSL Certificate is More Important than Ever Before

Image credit: Den Rise/Shutterstock.com

More than a billion web users’ personal information was stolen by cyber hackers in 2018. While large companies appear to be the victim of the vast majority of attacks, small business websites are proving to be an attractive target for cyber criminals looking to find an easy pathway to the riches that can come from the fraudulent use of everyday consumers’ personal financial information. While the level of illegal intrusion leveled-off last year, security experts are warning that recent advancements in website security measures may be doomed to the insistent and persistent improvement in hackers’ ability to adapt to the new security improvements.

Not unlike burglars who pass by homes with obvious security systems for an unprotected target, cyber criminals are turning to small business websites that fail to take even the most basic security actions to protect customer data. While the past two years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of websites taking actions to protect customers’ personal information, more remains to be done. The number of websites supporting HTTPS over encrypted Secure Socket Layer (SSL)/TLS connections has skyrocketed over the past year. Recent studies reveal that over 50 percent of web traffic is now encrypted. “Many sites need to catch up to avoid the ‘Not Secure’ warnings,” said DigiCert chief product officer Jeremy Rowley. “We urge IT administrators to check the sites they look after and deploy the appropriate TLS certificates.”

Perhaps the greatest incentive for website owners to gravitate to HTTPS protocol is coming soon from Google. With the release of Chrome 68 later this year, the search engine leader will mark all sites that haven’t adopted HTTPS as “Not Secure”. All other secured sites will continue to be displayed with green https letters in the URL, which means they are secured by an SSL certificate. Google will also give websites with encrypted connections a slight rankings boost. Imagine the number of website visitors who will be reluctant to frequent a company’s site when they are confronted with an “unsecure” warning. The consumer demands for increased web security is on the rise and consumer awareness of cyber security victimizations is heightened. It has been predicted that the Microsoft, Apple and Mozilla search engines will likely follow Google’s direction.

Research conducted by Ipsos, a global market research and consulting firm, found that 87% of internet users will not complete a transaction if they see a browser warning on a web page and more than half of respondents indicated they would seek to complete the purchase on a competitor’s secured website. SSL certificates have been available for decades but many website owners have delayed activation due to the perceived high cost and complications of implementation.

The cost associated with migrating to HTTPS and its significant benefits to a web owner is quickly becoming more affordable. Many hosting providers are offering free SSL certificates to clients. With “trust” becoming an important factor in the marketer/consumer relationship, a “secure” banner across the top of a company’s website is an indication that the site’s owner shares their customers’ concern for data security.

The Changing Complexity of Advertising

Image Credit: Jacob Lund Shutterstock.com

Once it was enough just to be careful where you placed the company logo or how you stated an advertising message. It was fairly simple. Prudence dictated that the company’s persona should not appear in a publication or in a position where accompanying content would cast a negative light on the brand. Certain publications were off limits, depending on the brand and the publication’s content. Messaging followed some basic dos and don’ts, usually established by some unseen censor whose job it was to monitor the sensitivities of “Joe or Josephine public” and establish some simple set of norms to be followed. Generalized messages were broadcasted to a wide audience and communication channels were fewer and relatively easy to monitor.

Careless advertisers were often chastised for testing the limits of the accepted norms of society, presenting content and images that nudged the outer edges of what was considered responsible behavior. Offenders either earned the rebuke and condemnation of a community or received accolades from those who appreciated a marketer’s sense of adventure. Either way, the risk of serious damage to a brand’s reputation was often tempered by an off-setting reward of increased public notoriety.

Ethical conduct in advertising and marketing has long been ripe with controversy and the subject of intense debates. The field of advertising is quickly becoming an environment where the definition of responsible is increasingly fragmented and more comprehensive than ever before. The process of creative discipline in advertising is changing dramatically and at warp speed. Parsing every word of content and scrutinizing every image in order to ensure (as much as possible) that the final effort doesn’t offend an increasingly diverse universe of consumers is a challenging effort.

“Niche is the new mass market,” says director and producer Justin Ching. “Gone are the days when you can appeal to everyone with your messaging, because of audience fragmentation.” Thirty years ago it was enough to sell a man a close, comfortable shave; today razor makers are selling a myriad of socially responsible issues as much as they are the blade and razor. Advertising is becoming a boxed set of social messaging and product features and benefits, carefully crafted to sell a solution while avoiding offending any one consumer or market segment.

YouTube is defending itself against what many are finding as objectionable content. Several big-name companies have pulled advertisements from the site over concerns their ads were running on videos of young children, primarily girls, on which pedophiles were making objectifying comments. In response, YouTube has disabled thousands of inappropriate comments and has suspended more than 400 offensive channels. “Any content, including viewer comments, that endangers minors is abhorrent and we have clear policies prohibiting this on YouTube,” a company statement said. “We took immediate action by deleting accounts and channels, reporting illegal activity to authorities and disabling comments on tens of millions of videos that include minors. There’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.”

It is hard to imagine that YouTube or any other marketing platform would deliberately risk such embarrassment and condemnation from its advertisers. The situation is an overt example of the difficulty and complexity of the challenges being faced by advertisers today.

The University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security Leads the Industry with Value and Forward-Thinking Expertise

Formed shortly after the terrorist attacks on our Nation in September of 2001, The University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security (CHHS) serves as the leader in policy development and legal analysis in the field of homeland security. Through its association with the University of Maryland, Baltimore, CHHS has grown to include partnerships with the Middle Atlantic Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefence and Emerging Infectious Diseases to bring together top experts from the scientific, emergency management, and public health communities.  Today, CHHS is home to a powerhouse of knowledge and expertise dedicated to the advancement of emergency management training, public health security, safety, and disaster recovery planning to public and private agencies across the United States.

CHHS’s forward-thinking expertise, led by Michael Greenberger, JD, includes academic programs and comprehensive consulting services that encompass community resilience, continuity of operations, cybersecurity, emergency management, exercise and training, health security, public safety technology, and recovery planning.  CHHS works with governmental and institutional organizations but maintains a focus on developing future emergency management leaders through Graduate degree programs and externships/internships.

“For organizations, both in the private sector and in the government, it’s critical to be prepared in the event of an emergency, from pandemics to government shutdowns.  The need for business continuity planning is often a low priority unless the threat is imminent.  The expert team at CHHS can assist your organization in preparing and planning to mitigate risk and limit the devastation in the event that a tragedy strikes,” comments Eric Oddo, Continuity Program Director, CHHS.

“The CHHS mission is critical for advancing our Nation’s security efforts. Their vast experience in emergency response, crisis management, cyber security and continuity of operations is a key resource for government and institutional organizations throughout the country. We are proud to have been selected to create a new online experience that effectively presents their comprehensive menu of services in a way that compliments the quality of their expertise,” comments Julie Gareleck, CEO & Managing Partner, Junction Creative Solutions. With more than 60 professionals on staff, CHHS continues to expand its client base in the Washington D.C., D.C. Metro, and Baltimore areas.  For those institutional and government organizations looking for tailored, holistic programs in emergency management and homeland security, contact us to learn more or call 410-706-1014.

Adopting Graphic Trends in Website Design to Boost Brand Success

Image credit: REDPIXEL.PL / Shutterstock.com

The results of a recent survey by Tyton Media is stressing the importance of website design in how customers perceive a brand. The survey indicated that 48 percent of people name website design as the biggest indicator of a company’s credibility. Website users are more likely to trust, remember, and connect with the brand if they find the website design consistent with the brand’s message and relevant to the brand’s reputation. Poor or irrelevant designs can alienate potential customers and create a negative impression. More than 80 percent of users who experience a poor web design will not return and are lost forever. So what design elements are trending in 2019?

Like fashion, popular designs tend to repeat themselves over time. What was fashionable in the past often reappears after falling out of favor. Amid the rise of 3D graphics, blogs, case studies, infographics, bold coloration, artificial intelligence and the predicted reemergence of hand-drawn graphics, simplicity is finding its reemergence into effective website design. The concept of “less is more” is finding renewed favor with designers and developers in 2019. Creating simple and concise messages that get straight to the point can be the most effective way to engage your audience. While simplicity makes a comeback, bold statements with bright color and gradient designs are trending up.

Today’s users are in a hurry, and “instant gratification” remains in vogue.  Websites have a narrow threshold of opportunity to attract, capture and move customers to initiate the buying decision. Removing unnecessary clutter, bells and whistles will help users navigate information and find the solutions they are seeking.  In the coming year, asymmetrical design is predicted to become a trend in order to attract a viewers’ attention. An unbalanced approach may just set a brand apart from the competition.

The use of animated GIFs and bots are finding their way into web designs at a greater pace, allowing for increased user convenience, more instant responses to customer inquiries and the ability for marketers to more directly target messages to consumer issues. Simpler layout, increased use of white space, flat design and clean practical aesthetics will premier.        Adapting to trending designs and using them to differentiate your brand and message will help cut through all the digital noise and set your brand apart from the competition.  To learn more about how Junction Creative Solutions’ (Junction) professional team of designers move your brand ahead of the competition, call 678-686-1125 today.

Okay, So Even the Venerable Super Bowl isn’t Always So Super

Image credit: Syda Productions / Shutterstock.com

It may not be as bad as finding an empty vault in Al Capone’s basement but the LIII Super Bowl Game certainly failed to deliver on the anticipated excitement, either for the fans watching the game or the advertisers who spent a large share of their annual marketing budget to advertise during the event. The estimated $5 million per 30-second spot always comes with a significant amount of doubt as to its real value.

This year’s mega game was the least watched Super Bowl matchup in 11 years and is ranked as the lowest rated in 16 years. CBS says the broadcast averaged 98.2 million viewers and a 41.1 household rating, almost as exciting as the activity playing out on the field. Even the halftime entertainment failed to excite the dulling malaise in the stadium. Perhaps the only star-studded performance of the week was the city of Atlanta and its ten thousand volunteers who put forth an award winning performance.

For advertisers who spent a ridiculous sum to produce a bevy of television commercials, they couldn’t be happy that the coveted number one commercial, as judged by the USA Today’s Super Bowl Ad Meter, was the event’s owners and producers, The National Football League. It’s akin to entering a contest and having the contest organizer take the top trophy at the end of the show. Runner-up was the Amazon Alexa ad about technology gone haywire, followed by Microsoft’s ad about children with disabilities using the Xbox adaptive controller to play video games. The major beer brands’ efforts appeared to be as skillful as the two competitors on the field, just a bit off their best games. It appears as though brewing beer with molasses is a big deal, or maybe not.

The only clear winners were women, whose participation rate in commercials ticked up over previous bowl events. Toyota, Olay, Bumble and Michelob Ultra are among the brands that put women front-and-center in Big Game ads. “It seems like there’s an awful lot of humor and light appeals, and that for advertisers it’s somewhat of a play-it-safe year,” said Charles R. Taylor, a professor of marketing at the Villanova University School of Business. “We’re not hearing about anything crossing over in politics.” A resounding Bravo could be heard from avid football fans that spent more than $2,500 per seat to be entertained and $1 thousand for a bed to sleep in after all the partying.

Now that the crowds have gone home and the Champion’s parade has cleared the streets, it’s time for the marketers who convinced their C Suites that the million (plural in many cases) dollar tab was worth the effort. In the end, taking win place or show in the ad game only matters when revenue is added up. Unlike last year, the players on the margins of ROI won’t have the Olympic Games to soften a rough landing.

One aspect of advertising the big game from year to year is the answer to the question, “Was it worth the money?” It still remains in the wind. Measuring the impact of a single-event television ad is like asking an AM radio personality how many people heard a specific 30 seconds of the broadcast. In reality, the best answer you can hope for is a fair share of the audience that hadn’t nodded-off. The most successful ads tend to be those that elevate the institutional value of the brand over time. It’s sort of “you’re not sure but you’ll know the answer when you feel it.” Regardless of the answer, it is almost a given certainty that most of the admen and adwomen who turned out a team to play in this year’s LIII Super Bowl will return for an encore performance next year. The whole thing is just too good of a spectacle to miss. And besides, would you want to be the marketing manager who passes on the one year that the competition beats you badly at the goal line?