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Adaptive Risk Advisors Reveals New Online Presence

When Adaptive Risk Advisors (ARA) was formed earlier this year, co-founder Miles Parker’s goal was to create a full service company focused on providing customized insurance solutions for high net worth business owners and individuals. Specializing in Commercial Property and Casualty, Workers’ Compensation, Fleet Vehicle, Liquor Liability, Cyber, and Luxury Home and Auto insurance coverage, ARA is a full service, independent agency focused on serving clients who desire a value-added relationship, competitive insurance rates and the best policies for unsurpassed price, coverage, and service. Based in Raleigh, North Carolina, Adaptive Risk Advisors is strategically located to provide services to Wake, Durham, Chatham, and surrounding counties.

“We believe personal contact and service will become the cornerstone of our success,” says Parker. “Our focus is on establishing client relationships rather than on client transactions. ARA’s success will be measured by our clients choosing us because of their belief in our ability to meet or exceed their expectations of price, service, and expertise.”

Junction Creative Solutions (Junction), an award-winning hybrid agency, was selected to design and develop an online experience to support the growing business.

“At Junction we share the belief that forming mutually beneficial relationships with clients is essential to business success and that honesty and trust are foundational to a company’s continued growth,” says Julie Gareleck, Junction’s Founder and CEO. “We appreciate the opportunity to be selected to work with Adaptive Risk Advisors on the launch of their website. We look forward to following their success!”

Adaptive Risk Advisors is ready to provide customized and affordable insurance solutions. Their knowledgeable, friendly staff can empathize with clients and their needs and create policies that meet or exceed their expectations. Call 984-212-8000 or visit https://adaptiveriskadvisors.com/ to learn more about Adaptive Risk Advisors.

Instagram Can be a Powerful Tool in Your Marketing Arsenal

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Launched in 2010, Instagram continues to grow at a remarkable pace. Just a little more than 7 years of age, the visual social media platform has surpassed 800 million monthly users and is not only attracting individual social conversations but is proving its worthiness to marketers looking to grow their brand’s awareness and showcase its products. With 51 percent of users indicating that they visit the site daily and 70 percent using the platform to search brands, Instagram has become a friendly, authentic method to connect with potential consumers. With ninety percent visual content, standing out in the crowd of 800 million users can be a daunting task for marketing professionals accustomed to relying on wordsmithing skills to get their message across. But the mostly wordless approach is becoming one of the most effective social media networks.

Generating increased brand awareness and building customer loyalty to drive increased sales requires a defined strategy based on consumer demographics, behaviors and identifying key motivations to purchase. “Logic persuades but feelings motivate, influencing a customer’s intention to purchase over anything else. According to a study, purely emotional campaigns were twice as likely to generate profit gains then those with a rational approach.”

It shouldn’t be a surprise that great content is at the core of a great social media campaign. With Instagram, building a great message is all about building a visual narrative where limited prose reflects and validates the image. While it is tempting to fall back on the tried and true adage, “a picture is worth a thousand words”, it is also true that most marketers struggle to communicate in a visual medium. Success with Instagram is derived from generating engaging content. The process begins with learning as much as possible about the medium, how customers are using the platform and understanding how the competition is succeeding in the space.

Create an expansive collection of unique content around a common theme and your desired persona. Be prepared to make adjustments, but be consistent with the message. Be creative but focused and invest in visual editing tools and experienced professional skill-sets when necessary. Engage socially with users and influencers who have already built a trusting relationship with their followers to better understand what is driving them to be interested in your brand. Use memorable and engaging hashtags and be sure to include a link to your website. Invite fellow users to share your content. Don’t miss an opportunity to call for action. Establish a set of reliable metrics to measure and frequently test your efforts’ performance.

Instagram can be a powerful tool in your marketing arsenal, but with all the potential benefits comes some risks. In a hyper-sensitive, socially correct landscape, creativity can often lead to misinterpretation. As with all social website platforms, care should be taken to avoid turning a positive message into a plethora of negative responses.

According to Instagram, 75% of users who see a business post take action. It is a medium that promises to continue to grow in size and effectiveness. Be prepared to adapt to changing trends.  Take advantage of new tools and features that create opportunities to interface with an ever expanding Instagram community, and resolve not to fall behind your competition.

Know This, Print Advertising is Not Dead

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In the United States print advertising spend has fallen from $65 billion at the beginning of this century to less than $19 billion by the end of 2016. The steady decline has many suggesting that print media advertising will continue to diminish and fall to the relentless onslaught of all things digital. However, the long history of dominance of print in advertising is making the medium more resilient against the relentless attack of new communication technologies, leading many media experts to declare that in spite of the fall from high, print is not dead. Research is revealing that readers trust the printed message more than any other medium. “The old trope that print is dead is just lazy thinking,” says Linda Thomas Brooks, president and CEO of the Association of Magazine Media.

The noise and constant clamor of digital is giving print an opportunity to live beyond the delete button and grab the reader’s attention. The rarity and uniqueness of a written, personalized message is attractive, especially to the C-level target. Luxury consumers still value tangible ad platforms, and glossy quality print collateral can still hold an audience’s attention. To be effective, print ads’ role in advertising will become one that supports the digital lead. “Print ads will be more effective if they are a complement to your digital campaigns already in play and entice readers to interact with your brand online,” says Jeannie Ruesch, of xero.com. The successful printed play will be achieved when it is fully integrated with a total campaign. At Meredith National Media Group, print revenue accounted for two-thirds of overall advertising revenue, and circulation represented 30 percent of revenue in 2017, making it the company’s second-largest revenue stream. “We see it as print and digital; not print or digital,” says Jon Werther, president.

“While digital continues to dominate multi-channel strategies, the art of print publications is not obsolete.” says Julie Gareleck, Managing Partner and CEO of Junction Creative Solutions (Junction). “Junction’s design team is rooted in graphic design with experience designing print collateral and publications for well-established Fortune 1000 Companies as well as small to mid-size business.” To be relevant, print content must be targeted and easily digestible and pass the skim test. The intent and purposefulness of the message needs to be readily identifiable to the reader and visually appealing. “If it looks like it was printed in 1978…the perception will be that the firm is still operating from 1978,” says Gareleck. All those tired, old newsletters must find their way to the burn pile.

Digital’s dominance has made consumers persistent multitaskers, dutifully monitoring our emails and text messages while navigating through daily tasks. Rarely do we give any message our full and undivided attention. Print content offers an opportunity to really focus and engage with the message. And to all those “print is dead” pundits, know this: According to the National Retail Federation, shoppers are most likely to start an online search after viewing a magazine ad.

Junction is a comprehensive partner that can assist with your print collateral needs, aligning with the overall brand goals and objectives. Contact us at 678-686-1125 to learn more about our print design capabilities!

Adobe Makes Major Acquisition to Enhance Competitive Market Position

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The recent purchase of Magento by Adobe has industry and financial pundits crowing support of the move. The $1.7 billion-dollar purchase positions Adobe to better compete with market giants like Salesforce and Oracle.  Magento is an open-source e-commerce platform originally brought to market in 2008. Its new 2.0 version was released late last year. The Magento platform is popular among small to mid-sized B2B and retail companies and the technology supports more than $155 billion in gross merchandise volume. The newest version was released with an aim to provide new ways to heighten user engagement, smoother navigation, improved conversion rates and revenue generation for store owners.

Magento 2.0 promises to address many of the shortcomings of its previous version.  Compared to its predecessor, 2.0 will run, on average, 20 percent faster resulting in more sales and increases in website search engine optimization. The checkout process is more streamlined allowing customers to navigate quicker through the purchase decision to checkout. Additional extensions and better administrative interface help reduce time spent managing the online store. With more and more consumers utilizing mobile devices to complete their shopping, version 2.0 has an improved look and functionality on mobile devices.

Adobe Systems Inc. says the acquisition is its third biggest and is meant to create an end-to-end system for designing digital ads, building e-commerce websites and other online customer experiences. The company is seeking to diversify from the digital media products that made it one of the world’s largest software companies.

John Bruno, a senior analyst at Forrester, called Adobe’s purchase a fair buy and one that opens a door to a segment of the market Adobe has not served well in the past. “Coupled with really strong growth for Magento, in my opinion, it’s a good buy,” Bruno said. “What’s more, this taps into the existential question of what CRM is—it started out as a sales tool and then came to include marketing automation, customer service and now commerce.”

Magento CEO Mark Lavelle will continue to lead the Magento team as part of Adobe’s Digital Experience business. The acquisition is expected to close in the third quarter, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. While the purchase awaits regulatory approval, each company will continue to operate independently.

For more information on how this important acquisition impacts upgrading to Magento 2.0 and how Junction Creative Solutions can help you navigate to a platform designed to enhance the growth and sustainability of your online store, call 678-686-1125.

Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, However in Marketing Not Just Any Color Will Do

 

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Are you feeling a little blue? Or perhaps you are feeling you’re in the pink? Color is frequently associated with our moods and how we feel about a topic of discussion or to elaborate on the day’s experiences. While many of these associations can be explained through personal preference, learned behavior or a result of individual culture and experience, some research studies have shown a valid correlation of color to personal motivation and behavior.  An Institute for Color Research’s study found that 92.6 percent of people surveyed said that color was the most important factor when purchasing products, and consumers’ subconscious judgment about products is influenced in 62 percent to 90 percent of cases by color alone.

Some colors can attribute the impact on behavior because of the nearly universal utilization to elicit an unchallenged response. Red, for instance, is the most commanding color of attention, perhaps due to societal utilization of the color red for everything from stop signs, fire trucks and flashing emergency lights. People have been pre-disposed to recognize and react to anything displayed red. It says, “This is important, pay attention!”  Forty-two percent more signs and advertisements are read when the color red is used, and comprehension of the message is increased as well.

Color also plays a major role in product identification. Tomato ketchup apparently is preordained to be red, in part because ripened tomatoes are mostly perceived as being red. Just ask Heinz, who discovered the public’s inherent relationship of the color red and ketchup. In an effort to excite and attract a younger consumer by making ketchup available in various colors, the marketers of fifty-seven varieties soon learned of the special relationship of red to consumers; perception of the product. Can we imagine a brown-colored Pepto Bismol?  How soothing is that perception? Marketers commonly use certain colors because those colors elicit generally accepted emotions.  While many of us react differently, most of us react in a similar way to the paring of colors to products. But there are broader messaging patterns to be found in color perceptions.

Savvy marketers of digital advertising use colors to increase conversion and click-through rates on websites. By utilizing color to differentiate call-to-action buttons or links they are driving user-consumers to take actions and improve the conversation. Understanding how design and color can work together to influence and motivate consumer behavior is a key factor to effective and efficient messaging. Studies have revealed that color can often be the sole reason someone purchases a product. In one survey, 93 percent of buyers said they focus on visual appearance, and nearly 85 percent of respondents indicated that color was a primary reason in the decision to purchase.

Customers will only respond favorably and strongly to a brand if the right color is chosen to represent that brand’s personality, culture and menu of products.  In a study titled “Impact of Color in Marketing,” researchers found that up to 90% of snap judgments made about products was based on color alone.  Research has also found that predicting consumer reaction to color appropriateness in relation to the product is far more important than the individual color, and it is extremely important that new brands specifically target logo colors that ensure differentiation from entrenched competitors.

The psychological impact of color on human behavior is neither an exact nor a settled science. But the impact of color on consumer perceptions and motivations is undeniable. So, while roses may be red and violets may be blue, in all things marketing not just any color will do.

To learn more on how color can influence purchasing behavior and enhance a brand’s identity, contact Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) at 678-686-1125.

Opening a New Door to Opportunity

Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) is an award-winning strategic agency committed to creating high impact solutions for SMBs and Fortune 500 companies. By combining the intellectual capital of a business consulting firm with the creative execution of an advertising agency, Junction is exceeding growth expectations and expanding by opening a new office in the Atlanta area. Near the Sandy Springs City Center, Junction is centrally located for easy access to Buckhead, Downtown or North Alpharetta. The new location helps better position Junction to meet the demands of its growing list of clients.

Seeing a rise in start-up companies, leveraging intellectual property, soon to hit the marketplace and with our increasing capability to perform quick turnaround Rapid and Custom Development website development projects as well as web-based applications, Junction has added qualified and experienced members to the staff, adding strategic experience across every layer of business. “Junction, for nearly a decade, has remained focused on building a team of talented professionals to not only drive our business but also our clients forward,” comments Julie Gareleck, CEO & Managing Partner, Junction.

The cross-disciplinary team, working for some of the most notable Fortune 100 and 500 brands, has proven that a collaborative, consultative approach can yield the best results.  “Our project management system was designed by engineers to streamline internal and external client communications, improve client satisfaction, and increase overall efficiencies. We don’t just talk about process, we are  passionate about implementing it,” adds Gareleck.

For more on how Junction Creative Solutions, a hybrid agency model for today’s business environment, can help your business meet its growth projections, call 678-686-1125 today.

Passion is Our Purpose and It’s Fueling Our Business

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John Mackey, as co-CEO of Whole Foods, once said of entrepreneurs, “Though they want to make money — start businesses out of passion.” He went on to say: “Physicians make money, but their mission is to heal; teachers make money, but their desire is to educate; and architects make money, but they yearn to build.” Looking at the day to day, quarter to quarter postings of profitability statistics constantly ticking across the bottom of our video screens, one would be hesitant to extoll business intentions to be anything other than making a profit. The truth, however, is that the most profitable businesses began as a dream; a vision to create something non-existent; a goal to provide a solution to the yet unsolved; a passion to fulfill a very personal need.

It’s not that a profit motive is undesirable or misguided. Without profit, even the most well-intentioned business is unsustainable over time. Perhaps it is more of a chicken or egg thing. What comes first? In today’s most competitive environments customers want to be appreciated for being more than a source of revenue. They are looking to businesses to focus as much on delivering value and fulfilling a purpose as they do on profitability.

As we look at some businesses, it is easy to recognize that intentions can be misguided. “Many entrepreneurs enter into business thinking ‘I am going to get rich quick or I am going to take advantage of a gap in the industry and over-price customers for work,’” says Julie Gareleck, founder and CEO of Junction Creative Solutions (Junction). “Financially motivated organizations tend to be here today in good economic times and gone in tomorrow’s economic down-turn. Purpose and value must be foundational to a company’s vision and must align with the organization’s financial goals for profitability.”

The Junction team of experienced professionals is passionately focused on partnering with clients to create value. “Whether developing a complex comprehensive strategy or executing digital solutions, it’s all about our customers, and the process of providing quality work. It is the differentiator in our business,” says Gareleck. “We don’t take on clients just to take on clients. We invest our time and energy into clients that want our help and want to partner with us to achieve something greater.  It is a model for success that we have proven over and over.”

“When you believe in something the force of your convictions will spark other people’s interest and motivate them to help you achieve your goals. This is essential to success.”- Richard Branson.

To learn more about Junction’s passion for helping others to achieve success, call 678-686-1125.

Missing an Opportunity to Positively Advance the Corporate Brand

How one major retailer is botching a socially responsible message!

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Social responsibility is becoming an increasingly important aspect of marketing a business in America. Consumers are commanding that small and large business adopt practices that mirror their individual concerns on the impact of company’s operational activities on the environment and other social issues. To be responsible and to attract eco-friendly consumers, retailers across the country are adopting policies that deliver on consumers’ social and environmental expectations.

As many states implement laws that regulate reusable plastic bags and containers, some retailers are getting out in front of legislative efforts and imposing new policies that align with consumer expectations. Recognizing the potential benefit to implementing eco-friendly packaging, some major retailers are voluntarily replacing reusable plastic bags and containers with biodegradable, recyclable or reusable, carry-away containers for customer purchases. Clearly market leaders believe that what is good for customers’ concern for the environment is good for business.

In May, Disney announced that it would be eliminating plastic bags and switching to reusable bags at 215 of its retail stores nationwide and, for one week, guests at its stores would receive a branded, reusable bag for free while supplies lasted. The move came as a surprise to consumers as well as other industry leaders who instituted free, environmentally responsible alternative packaging to customers. Apparently at Disney, the new policy on eco-packaging would be to require customers to pay an additional fee of 99 cents for their corporate social concerns. For loyal Disney patrons, many of whom failed to get the limited release of the memo, the display of social responsibility by the corporate giant felt more like consumer extortion, rather than an example of a corporate culture of social and environmental responsibility.

In a recent visit to a Disney Store in the Atlanta area, two loyal Disney customers approached the counter with armfuls of items to purchase. After tallying the sale, the Disney associate asked the customers if they would like to purchase a branded, reusable container bag for their numerous items. After declining the offer, the customers were told that they were welcome to carry out the items without a bag but that Disney would no longer be providing free carry-out containers, plastic or otherwise. The cashier went on to explain that management was “concerned about employees spending too much time unpacking all those boxes of plastic bags and that many of their customers were very upset over the new policy.” No kidding!

It is hard to imagine a more egregious example of engaging a new corporate policy that was meant to demonstrate a company’s positive environmental responsibility. Is the cost of Disney’s environmental responsibility being imposed, in total, on their customers? Is the real policy meant to display a corporate concern for the well-being of the environment or concern for the cost associated with employees’ efforts to unpack “all those boxes of bags?” Surely, incorporating the cost of free, branded bags could be absorbed into the cost of doing business (as the former plastic bags were) or charged-off to the marketing collateral budget. Just imagine all those “Disney” blazed bags with their long shelf life walking forever through grocery stores, big box competitors and shopping malls all around the country.

Perhaps the new policy introduction has suffered from Mr. Murphy’s law or from poor messaging, or a misunderstanding by some isolated corporate associates. Whatever the reasons for this marketing debacle the new policy cannot be seen as leading to any positive result for the corporate giant or its loyal customers.

With online purchases at an all-time high, brick and mortar retailers are being encouraged to focus marketing efforts on providing a positive and engaging shopping experience to customers. It is inarguably being predicted that their very survival depends on it. Either Disney management failed to recognize the importance of consumers’ shopping experience or they have failed to grasp the fundamentals of rolling out an important new policy that surely was designed to positively advance the Company’s brand.

The Most Important Marketing Content is Video

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It is interesting that the more that fundamentals of just about everything change with time and technology, the more so many well-established truisms remain the same.  The era of content being king in marketing is giving way to a new visual medium, a rerun of the progression from printed media advertising to television more than a half century ago. Despite all the dramatic shifts in the methods of communications over time, a picture is still worth a thousand words.

Today the most important  content marketing is video. Regardless of the platform; Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat or YouTube, video has become an essential part of any organization’s overall marketing strategy. Video seems to be adding value to the customer’s content experience. When both video and text are available on the same page, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service, and 85% of consumers indicate that they prefer to see more video from brands in the coming year. With such positive response from consumers, brands are responding by increasing video participation.

With 81% of businesses utilizing video in marketing campaigns (up from 63% just a year ago), 99% of those predict they will continue to use the medium in the future. Clearly content alone is being dethroned. Video is here to stay and marketers should embrace the change. The medium brings with it more opportunity for brands to be creative in their messaging. As with content alone, quality trumps quantity.

With four distinctive platforms available, videos can be created to take advantage of each platform’s unique targeting capabilities. Whatever the goal of the video, it should be defined at the outset of the process and be used to tailor a particular strategy. Consumers are becoming increasingly selective about the content they consume, so it is important to develop videos that are educational and entertaining.

The cost of producing a single video can range from $1,000 to $10,000 depending upon the level of complexity and professionalism of the production, but with 64% of consumers more likely to make a purchase after watching a video and with the potential of reaching millions of viewers with one single video, the cost is justified.

For more on how video can impact your brand’s awareness and its importance in an effective content marketing strategy, contact Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) at   678-686-1125.