“What is old is new again” May Be the Most Surprising Trend in Marketing in 2019

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Believe it or not, we have once again come full circle on another year. Marketing prognosticators are polishing their crystal balls of future things to come and declaring how technology will revolutionize our channels of communication with consumers in 2019.  Last year’s predicted trends are being measured against reality, and the process is becoming akin to scoring a competitive game of sport.

As with so many games in life the results of our collective efforts to predict the future of marketing tactics and activities are never completely aligned with perfection. Shifting consumer expectations and the response to accepting new communication technologies make the playing field difficult to read and an unsuited environment for calling a perfect game. All we can really do is take stock of what is working, evaluate why some predictions failed, make necessary adjustments to the strategy for 2019 and move forward. The most successful predictions of marketing in 2018 appeared to be offered by those who envisioned a broader and less specific set of outcomes.

“While some industries have embraced the paradigm shift in how they reach, engage, and mobilize new customers, I predict that we will see even more attention and focus being placed on getting the marketing mix correct,” predicted Julie Gareleck, CEO & Managing Partner, Junction Creative Solutions. The year’s performance appears to have been another example that absolutes and inevitabilities rarely pan out. So what appears likely to work best in 2019?

Video Marketing’s performance will continue to align with the previously predicted game plan. A Cisco forecast indicates that video will make up 85% of Internet traffic by 2020. While posts with digital images and content continue to capture a significant audience, video is generating 135% more organic reach for marketers. Once seen as an opportunity for only the most well-healed, larger players, video is becoming more economical for those smaller marketers who can benefit from projecting an emotional and appealing story. According to The Wall Street Journal, “the usage of online video has increased by 10 times between 2011 and 2016. Over the next two years, the trend has only intensified and is unlikely to slow down.”

Automating the marketing process to work more efficiently and smarter will continue to pay dividends of better understanding customers.  Scott Brinker, Founder of Chief MarTec, said, “As much amazing marketing software as there is today, there is still an opportunity for new ideas. Marketing should be — and can be — better.”  Automation will be seen as another set of marketing tools that enhances the acquisition of new customers.

Smart marketers will continue to develop an expanded inbound approach to connecting with their market segments. Content marketing, automation, social media and multichannel marketing can be coordinated to create a brand reputation that is authentic and valuable to customers. Consumers are more often placing trust in those they know. Quality, reputable content will prevail over stock ads in the coming year. If one were to bet on an absolute, a continuing utilization of inbound marketing tactics is a wise wager for 2019.

Once predicted to be rendered obsolete; direct mail, print advertising and brick and mortar sellers are showing some unexpected resilience in the digital age. Not unlike wax LP’s return to popularity among a niche market of music lovers in a world of digital recordings, old school marketing tactics are finding success with consumers who are tired of the incessant barrage of digital media noise and those who long to revisit a traditional physical shopping experience. Players on the field of brick and mortar will need to focus on creating entertaining events and an enticing experience for their target markets.

Who would have thought it: consumers like getting mail, even if it was once thought to be junk? Print advertising is not dead. While a small and much diminished portion of overall marketing spend, print is finding its rightful place in the digital world. In the field of marketing where a fast, bang, digital technology appears to arise every minute, the most surprising trend in marketing for 2019 may just be “what is old is new again.”

Will Your 2019 Annual Strategic Plan Take You Where You Want to Go?

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With the booming economy, most businesses are entering the time of year when just keeping ahead of the day-to-day demands of the consumer is daunting. Just like that it’s time to start strategic planning for 2019.

For those who say they are ready to get out in front and get started on planning for next year, the news is not so good. If you haven’t already begun the planning process, you are no longer out in front. Entrepreneurs are, by nature, an optimistic lot. It is a required trait if endless obstructions and road blocks are to be overcome and success is to be achieved. The vision is important, but the euphoria that often accompanies the vision can sometimes cloud and delay the planning process. Progress, as a result, can be stymied.

It has been said that the only true absolute is change, and today’s technology is accelerating the rate of change exponentially. Anticipating a dynamic competitive environment and initiating proactive steps to position products and services to meet the pace of consumer needs is paramount to remaining relevant.  Are you ready with a strategic plan for 2019 that positions you to capitalize on emerging trends and that supports your vision?

Begin now by taking stock of this year’s successes and failures. What has worked and what has failed to meet expectations? Remember, we learn the most important lessons from our failures. Why didn’t it work? What are the options to turning a loss in 2018 to a win in the coming year? As you form a strategy for 2019, establish reasonable and measurable short and long term goals. It may be time to shed a bit of the euphoria and focus more on the mundane aspects of reality. What are your goals and what do you want your organization to achieve for 2019? Build the future on those things that have worked in the past. While some believe that if it isn’t broken, you haven’t looked hard enough, the truth lies more often than not in the adage, “if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.” Tweak it, polish-off some wear and tear, and move on.

Take some time, even if only a few minutes a day, to look outside the confines of your world. What is your most successful competitor doing? What are other industries doing that is working for them? Don’t be so quick to say “it can’t work here.” Seek out others’ input in the planning process. Not all the world’s best answers originate from inside your head. Expand on your circle of business associates and develop and broaden the diversity of professional opinion and perspectives.

Strategic planning is the first step in a progression from vision to reality. It should clearly align the organization’s focus and efforts on achieving the goal. Be committed and unwavering to the planning process and even more committed to its engagement.

Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) can provide an external perspective to align your internal goals and objectives and prepare a strategy for continued growth. Contact us at 678-686-1125 for additional information regarding our strategic consulting services!

A Responsive Web Design Can Determine the Effectiveness of Your Website

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Internet access from mobile devices now represents 63 percent of all traffic in the United States. Mobile now has more total page views than desktop. If your company has not adequately modified your website to function consistently across multiple sized device screens, the time to do so is now.  In 2019, mobile advertising will represent 72 percent of all U.S. advertising spending, and with 83 percent of mobile device users indicating that a seamless website experience across all devices is important, it is imperative that a marketer’s web-presence is optimized for mobile.  A poor mobile presence can make an organization appear unprofessional and out of sync with a web savvy consumer.

Responsive Web Design (RWD), an approach to creating a website that allows it to work on any device; whether it’s a mobile phone, tablet, TV or a laptop, is mostly credited to Ethan Marcotte, an independent web designer and author who in 2010 said, “Rather than tailoring disconnected designs to each of an ever-increasing number of web devices, we can treat them as facets of the same experience. We can [make our] designs […] more adaptive to the media that renders them.”  Today, a responsive web design can determine the effectiveness of a website. A recent study by Tyton Media, found that 94 percent of people cited web design as the reason they mistrusted or rejected a website. A responsive website design increases the chances that users will stay longer and engage more with a web experience.

Three fundamental aspects of a responsive web design are fluid layouts, responsive images and media queries. Fluid layouts allow a website to automatically adjust fixed widths to expand and contract to display consistently on all screen sizes. This eliminates visual distortions and jumbled text and promotes a smooth and seamless presentation regardless of the device. Responsive websites have also been shown to have a greater likelihood of ranking higher in search engine results pages.

Making images adaptive and responsive is a very important step in creating a responsive web design because it can affect both a website’s speed and its search engine friendliness. The ability for images to grow and shrink with a user’s browser to fit the web page will result in shorter page loading times, particularly when accessed on devices with 3G or slower connections. Media queries tailor a web page’s representation to devices with screens of any size and allow for specific rules for hiding, growing, moving or showing content, resulting in a better user experience.

With more consumers spending a majority of time on the internet, it is critical that web designers create excellent, workable and responsive websites that focus on design, usability and accessibility across all devices. A well designed and responsive website will increase consumers’ trust and generate customer traffic and increased conversion rates.

For more information on how Junction Creative Solutions’ (Junction) developers and designers can help make your website more responsive, call 678-686-1125 today.

Instagram Can be a Powerful Tool in Your Marketing Arsenal

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Launched in 2010, Instagram continues to grow at a remarkable pace. Just a little more than 7 years of age, the visual social media platform has surpassed 800 million monthly users and is not only attracting individual social conversations but is proving its worthiness to marketers looking to grow their brand’s awareness and showcase its products. With 51 percent of users indicating that they visit the site daily and 70 percent using the platform to search brands, Instagram has become a friendly, authentic method to connect with potential consumers. With ninety percent visual content, standing out in the crowd of 800 million users can be a daunting task for marketing professionals accustomed to relying on wordsmithing skills to get their message across. But the mostly wordless approach is becoming one of the most effective social media networks.

Generating increased brand awareness and building customer loyalty to drive increased sales requires a defined strategy based on consumer demographics, behaviors and identifying key motivations to purchase. “Logic persuades but feelings motivate, influencing a customer’s intention to purchase over anything else. According to a study, purely emotional campaigns were twice as likely to generate profit gains then those with a rational approach.”

It shouldn’t be a surprise that great content is at the core of a great social media campaign. With Instagram, building a great message is all about building a visual narrative where limited prose reflects and validates the image. While it is tempting to fall back on the tried and true adage, “a picture is worth a thousand words”, it is also true that most marketers struggle to communicate in a visual medium. Success with Instagram is derived from generating engaging content. The process begins with learning as much as possible about the medium, how customers are using the platform and understanding how the competition is succeeding in the space.

Create an expansive collection of unique content around a common theme and your desired persona. Be prepared to make adjustments, but be consistent with the message. Be creative but focused and invest in visual editing tools and experienced professional skill-sets when necessary. Engage socially with users and influencers who have already built a trusting relationship with their followers to better understand what is driving them to be interested in your brand. Use memorable and engaging hashtags and be sure to include a link to your website. Invite fellow users to share your content. Don’t miss an opportunity to call for action. Establish a set of reliable metrics to measure and frequently test your efforts’ performance.

Instagram can be a powerful tool in your marketing arsenal, but with all the potential benefits comes some risks. In a hyper-sensitive, socially correct landscape, creativity can often lead to misinterpretation. As with all social website platforms, care should be taken to avoid turning a positive message into a plethora of negative responses.

According to Instagram, 75% of users who see a business post take action. It is a medium that promises to continue to grow in size and effectiveness. Be prepared to adapt to changing trends.  Take advantage of new tools and features that create opportunities to interface with an ever expanding Instagram community, and resolve not to fall behind your competition.

Opening a New Door to Opportunity

Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) is an award-winning strategic agency committed to creating high impact solutions for SMBs and Fortune 500 companies. By combining the intellectual capital of a business consulting firm with the creative execution of an advertising agency, Junction is exceeding growth expectations and expanding by opening a new office in the Atlanta area. Near the Sandy Springs City Center, Junction is centrally located for easy access to Buckhead, Downtown or North Alpharetta. The new location helps better position Junction to meet the demands of its growing list of clients.

Seeing a rise in start-up companies, leveraging intellectual property, soon to hit the marketplace and with our increasing capability to perform quick turnaround Rapid and Custom Development website development projects as well as web-based applications, Junction has added qualified and experienced members to the staff, adding strategic experience across every layer of business. “Junction, for nearly a decade, has remained focused on building a team of talented professionals to not only drive our business but also our clients forward,” comments Julie Gareleck, CEO & Managing Partner, Junction.

The cross-disciplinary team, working for some of the most notable Fortune 100 and 500 brands, has proven that a collaborative, consultative approach can yield the best results.  “Our project management system was designed by engineers to streamline internal and external client communications, improve client satisfaction, and increase overall efficiencies. We don’t just talk about process, we are  passionate about implementing it,” adds Gareleck.

For more on how Junction Creative Solutions, a hybrid agency model for today’s business environment, can help your business meet its growth projections, call 678-686-1125 today.

Achieving a Vision for the Future through Value-Based Leadership

The need for effective leadership in business has never been more in demand in the history of commerce. The dynamic conditions that exist in this technology driven, disruptive business environment are dramatic in comparison to times past. With organizations under constant pressure to cut costs, develop new products, become more efficient and improve quality just to remain competitive, effective leadership at all levels is crucial to survival and success.

Much debate and discussion abounds over what constitutes a leader, what qualities one must possess and what style of leadership is most effective. Leadership can be hard to define and it means different things to different people. Leaders set direction and help others do the right thing to achieve the company’s vision. While leaders manage delivery of the vision and facilitate and inspire others to achieve a shared objective, leadership is not management. People are led, processes are managed.  As French writer, poet, aristocrat, journalist, and pioneering aviator opined, “If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.”

A well led organization’s values should be clearly defined and are the basis for a company’s culture.  Today, more than ever, “Leaders must lean on the values of the organization to drive performance, especially during times of change. Values should be the bedrock of why the company exists, how it makes decisions and its true purpose.” Metrics and milestones are still important in measuring performance, but values are at the core of what and how those measures are achieved.

Values-based leaders communicate organizational values to employees by connecting company goals to employees’ personal values. Such leaders focus on the organization’s core beliefs to facilitate employees’ belief in the sincerity and depth of the organization’s mission. Leadership must lead with overt confidence and by example, communicating consistently the vision for the future. “It’s hard to lead a cavalry charge if you think you look funny on a horse,” said Adlai E. Stevenson II.

Today’s best companies focus on a realistic and compelling vision and are led by those who demonstrate an ability to inspire, motivate, coach and deliver on achieving the vision. As leadership expert Warren Bennis once stated, “Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality.”

Ultimately a leader will be judged on the ability to maximize the potential and performance of an organization’s human resources, who together successfully create value and sustainability into the future.

For information about how Junction Creative Solutions’ experienced team of business development experts can help you lead your organization to achieving an inspiring vision, contact info@junction-creative.com.

JUNCTION CEO PARTICIPATES ON ATLANTA BUSINESS RADIO X’S INAUGURAL “TUESDAYS WITH COREY” RADIO SHOW

Julie Cropp Gareleck, CEO and Managing Partner, Junction Creative, participated in Atlanta Business X’s Radio Show “Tuesdays with Corey.” Gareleck shared insights from her days as a waitress in Gettysburg, PA to her current position as the CEO of her Atlanta based firm.  Corey Rieck, President and Founder of The Long Term Care Planning Group, sponsors the show each month, highlighting women entrepreneurs, CEOs, and executives.

When asked about her experience growing up in a family business, Gareleck shared that her goal was to become a reporter like Barbara Walters.  Unbeknownst to her, the passion she held for people and helping people drove her to launch Junction Creative, a hybrid between a traditional consulting firm and an advertising agency, melding intellectual insights with creative execution.  To listen to her journey, forward to 30 minutes into the full interview.

“I greatly appreciate being included as a member of this panel alongside Barb Giamanco, Barbara LoRusso, Corey Rieck, and the team at Atlanta Business Radio X,” comments Gareleck.  “The collective knowledge sitting around the table made for a great conversation about some of the critical elements for success in business.”

Click here to listen to the entire show!

More information on each panelist is below:

Corey Rieck is the President and Founder of The Long Term Care Planning Group, a firm that specializes in delivering Long Term Care education and coverage to companies, high net worth individuals and large organizations. Since 2001, Corey has devoted his career to Long Term Care as a result of multiple personal experiences.  A neutral provider of Long Term Care Solutions since 2001, Corey brings a unique and comprehensive consultative perspective to this issue.  Since 2003, part of his commitment to the Long Term Care Industry includes his having trained over 3,500 advisors from San Francisco to Wall Street on how to properly position Long Term Care to clients through the CLTC organization.

Corey hosts a weekly show call “Tuesdays with Corey” on Atlanta Business Radio.

Barb Giamanco heads up Social Centered Selling. She’s the co-author of The New Handshake: Sales Meets Social Media and authored the Harvard Business Review article Tweet Me, Friend Me, Make Me Buy.

With a successful C-level background in Sales, Technology and Leadership Development, Barb capped her corporate career at Microsoft, where she led sales teams and coached executives. Through the years she has sold $1B in sales.

Barb is consistently recognized as a Top Sales and Business Blogger, a Top 25 Influential Leader in Sales, a Top 25 Sales Influencer on Twitter and one of Top Sales World’s Top 50 Sales and Marketing Influencers for the 3rd year in a row. And recently, Barb was named one of the Top 65 Business Influencers among other leaders such as Ariana Huffington, Melinda Gates and Sheryl Sandberg.

Connect with Barb on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

Barbara LoRusso is the Director of Client Development for LoRusso Law Firm, an Atlanta-based civil litigation firm opened by her husband, Lance LoRusso, almost 10 years ago. Prior to this, Barbara was doing consulting and research work for a non-profit trade association here in Atlanta for almost 20 years. She has a Ph.D. in Applied Psychology from University of Georgia and went to Emory as an undergraduate.

Barbara has been an active volunteer with charitable organizations and currently serves on the board of SafePath Children’s Advocacy Center in Marietta.

Connect with Barbara on LinkedIn.

Julie Cropp Gareleck

Born into an entrepreneurial family, Julie Gareleck was convinced that business was not her passion and that becoming a reporter was more intriguing. At the age of 21, Julie punched her international card, in Paris, working for Angela de Bona, the top PR Agent, representing the top fashion photographers in the world. A venture to Philadelphia after Paris directed Julie to work for a leading entrepreneurship institute.

In a few short years, she was recruited to join a venture capital organization, focused on early stage companies in Technology, Biotechnology, among other industries, as its Executive Director. Julie earned her place in the Board Room at the age of 25.

A transition to Atlanta over 12 years ago enabled Julie to take her strategy experience and work as a senior strategist for interactive advertising agencies. It was here that Julie realized there was a gap between business-based strategy and what was defined as strategy at agencies. Junction Creative Solutions was born out of the need for strategies that intersect key business segments and the need for a firm that can manage the implementation. For over 8 years, Junction has worked with nearly 225 companies, helping do just that.

Julie has created an environment that empowers her team and her clients to be the very best they can be, and success follows naturally. She has earned the respect of her peers not just for her shining personality, but for her authenticity, integrity, and drive as a business leader. Her portfolio includes measurable integrated strategies for prominent brands across various industries, including Yahoo!, Mailboxes Etc., National City Corporation (PNC Bank), GE Energy, Mohawk Industries, Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc. (SWM), and Alcatel-Lucent. Early stage companies in the portfolio include AcuteCare Telemedicine, 85 Broads, Intelaplay, Competitive Sports Analysis, XIOSS, Infinite Resource Solutions, Guardian Watch, Pro Diligence, Cost Management Group, the National Tennis Foundation, Saffire Vapor, among others.

Julie established the JXN Executive Roundtable in 2012 as a resource for entrepreneurs, senior executives, and marketing leaders to share industry experiences and insights. She remains actively involved in industry organizations often participating as an expert panelist or guest speaker.

Follow Junction Creative on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

JCP: From Catalogues to Denim Bars!?!

The most experienced and effective marketing professionals will usually agree that keeping the client in the press and on the public’s mind is beneficial to promoting brand identity, especially in an institutional fashion.  Frequent articles and stories can help grow a brands identity across marketing segments and expose the brand to new potential customers who may be inspired by the information and may be motivated to test, what is to them, an unfamiliar brand.  In the case of good news, it can create excitement and motivation, after all we all love being part of a good success story.  But when it comes to polishing the brand, attracting new converts and growing a business; too much bad news can be really, really bad news for a struggling business!

News continues to trickle out of the troubled retailer, J.C. Penney.  It’s bad news for its business partners and investors, bad news for thousands of its associates, and particularly bad news for its loyal customers.

We all look to our business leaders, the CEO’s, the Presidents, the Board Directors and the COO’s for lessons and inspiration, unfortunately as is the case in life’s many best learned lessons,  we often learn the most profound lessons from our failures.  The leadership at J.C. Penny has contributed more than its fair share of lessons over the past two years.

The Board of Directors of J.C. Penney Company, Inc. [NYSE: JCP], recently announced that Myron E. (Mike) Ullman, III has rejoined the Company as  Chief Executive Officer, effective immediately.  He has also been elected to the Board of Directors.  Mr. Ullman is a highly accomplished retail industry executive, who served as CEO of J.C. Penney until late 2011.  He succeeds Ron Johnson, who is stepping down and leaving the Company.

This most recent departure of leadership makes J.C. Penny America’s most cautionary tale and follows a plot line of mass exodus of loyal customers and a 25% reduction in company revenues.  Penney lost almost a billion dollars, half a billion of it in the final quarter alone. The company’s stock price, which jumped twenty-four percent after Johnson announced his plans, has since fallen almost sixty percent and twenty-one thousand jobs have been lost.

Upon his departure, Johnson has become the target of unrelenting criticism. “There is nothing good to say about what he’s done,” Mark Cohen, a former C.E.O. of Sears Canada, who is now a professor at Columbia, “Penney had been run into a ditch when he took it over. But, rather than getting it back on the road, he’s essentially set it on fire.  Johnson, and his previous compatriots in failed leadership, seemed determined on implementing wide sweeping, revolutionary marketing strategies that appeared to be destined from the outset to miss the target when it came to the largest segment of its customer base.  The new revolutionary strategy’s only success was to frustrate and confuse the company’s loyal fans and left everyone to ponder three questions.   Where did their familiar retailer go?  Who were they trying to become?  And where were they going?

Turning a major company away from its past identity and moving it forward with a strategy that brings a sleepy and complacent giant into the new business market reality is difficult, really difficult.  But large brand remodeling and revolutionary, untested marketing strategies most often bring about decline and failure not success.  Michael Roberto, a management professor at Bryant University, put it this way. “Small wins help you build support both internally and externally, and they make it easier for people to buy in.”

Penney’s board no doubt believed that Johnson’s record with former employers, Target and Apple, all but guaranteed that he’d succeed at J.C. Penney.  But this perception probably reflects what psychologists call “the fundamental attribution error”, our tendency to ignore context and attribute an individual’s success or failure solely to inherent qualities.   Ron Johnson has become an example of what Warren Buffet believes, “When a manager with a reputation for brilliance tackles a business with a reputation for poor fundamental economics, it is the reputation of the business that remains intact.” At the onset, Johnson brought an Apple-minded focus on reinventing business innovations whilst losing site of the core fundamentals of the business.  Perhaps the most profound lesson from Ron Johnson’s missteps can be attributed solely to J.C. Penny’s Board for its decision to select Johnson for the leadership role to begin with.

While Penney can’t erase the last 14-months, there is inherent value in the lessons learned.  Vision is not always a recipe for success.  As marketers, we keep our thumb on the pulse of what is trending in all social, local, and mobile.  Our ideas are fueled by advancements in technology.   However, success is a result of systematically assessing the wants, needs, motivations, and expectations of those we serve not those that lead.  Penney needs to get back to the fundamentals of its core business and the customers it serves.

A Strategy of Assured Destruction

How is it that the vast majority advances in technology, cutting edge products and innovative concepts and designs are born, not from the giants or current industry leaders, but rather from outsiders, the bystanders of the great industries, who have neither the resources nor the obvious capability to make great advancements in technology, product develop or revolutionary marketing advancements.

The once great industry leader Kodak was built on a culture of innovation and change.  It’s the type of culture that’s full of passionate innovators, already naturally in tune to the urgency surrounding changes in the market and technology, the kind of people that keep a company on the cutting edge of innovation and change, developing one new remarkable success after another and always keeping the door of opportunity tightly locked against the competitors entry.  If anyone was destined to become the master of digital imagery, it was Kodak, but of course it was not.

Some look to poor strategy for the failure of Kodak, but others to manager complacency, or the arrogance of entitlement.  The organizations leadership shifted the focus from creating new innovating opportunities to establishing an achievable financial benchmark as the desired organizational target, thus transferring the organizations objective from the innovations to calculations.

Geoffrey Moore, author of Escape Velocity: Free Your Company’s Future from the Pull of the Past, speaks of the phenomena in this way, “In large enterprises typically the annual planning process begins with the CFO circulating last year’s plan, circling the numbers in Q4, with the suggestion that managers multiply these by 4 to get a revenue target for next year, and then put together a plan to reach that number.  By so doing management teams confer an entitlement upon existing lines of business to get “first dibs” at all the scarce resources.  By the time the new business opportunities get to the table, the pickings are slim, and the critical resources for developing new markets are gone entirely.  This makes the enterprise captive to its past, and is at the core of established enterprises’ recurrent failures to achieve breakout growth, even when next-generation categories are booming all around them.

As new technologies threaten to disrupt a company’s traditional product and its market position, the strategy must shift form maintaining the status quo and preserving the time tested products to one of reinventing the company and embracing the new threatening technology.  According to Mr. Moore, there are three “pivot points” to the new strategy; Technology, where the company divests itself of the traditional product and wholly embraces the new technology; pivoting on the customer by maintaining their business and brand relationship while changing to the new product technology, or altering  their management expertise entirely and embark on a new course all together.

According to Geoffrey Moore, “What you cannot do is to stand pat”, the tendency of many iconic companies, resulting in a strategy of assured destruction.