Be Contextual. Be Relevant.

If Facebook was a country, it would have a population of 400 million and be the third largest country in the world. 70% of its users are outside the United States.  Nearly 50% of all users login daily.  YouTube announced that it has reached 2 billion videos on the popular portal.  Twitter has more than 75 million user accounts. Linked In boasts 50 million users. Flickr hosts more than 4 billion images.

We see the statistics.  We hear the industry buzz.  Yet, many of us fail to harness the power of social media to be contextual and relevant to target consumers.  What are you waiting for?  Build your own country.

“Comprehensive” means what?

As companies explore marketing solutions designed to create awareness, build influence, and ultimately generate revenue, it’s incredibly challenging to create a truly “comprehensive” marketing strategy.   What does “comprehensive” mean?

It’s more than just one solution, one tactic, and one person’s idea.  It’s about many solutions such as: Twitter, a blog, a press room, LinkedIn, affiliate marketers, media buying, media pitching, seminars, podcasts, webinars, mobile applications, or Facebook.    It’s about having an ongoing tactical execution that can be adapted over time as needed.  It’s about collective perspective.

Whether you are a small business owner or a member of the corporate marketing team, be mindful of your strategy.  The marketing mix if executed consistently will establish a relationship with target audiences, encourage participation in the conversation, and mobilize audiences to act.

We’d love to hear how you are being more comprehensive?

The Sphere of Influence

Chris Brogan talks about unique perspective on how to make money with your blog.  Loosely translated from a recent interview, he advises never to ask your community for money, but rather ask the larger corporations for money. By not asking your community directly for money, they in turn will seek you out.  He notes that Oprah is successful example of that.  When she recommends a book or product, people rush out to buy it on her referral.

If you find this at all intersting, I suggest reading “Trust Agents” by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith.  Tell me what you think.

Turning Friends Into Customers

Another company leveraging fans, friendships, and family to move products.

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/07/how-to-turn-your-blogs-readers-into-paying-customers/?src=me&ref=technology

Will this latest trend  provide consumer adoption and expected conversion?

The Impact of a Brand: Nike

Nike is certainly making waves with a bold, new commercial where Tiger Woods stares blankly into the camera as the voice of late Earl Woods questions the golfer.  Whether you think this ad is genius or just plain odd, the impact of this commercial is certainly producing results.  Kudos Nike!

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/08/sports/golf/08tv.html?ref=business

Branding You Won’t Forget

This is the most unique brand experience that I had to share:
Call Nestle Hotline at 1-800-295-0051. When asked if you want to continue in English or Spanish, wait QUIETLY for about 10 seconds and I PROMISE you will smile. Keep going and press 4. Then any option after. Don’t ruin the surprise for the next person.

Thanks Nestle for shaking things up!