Another Super Event In the ATL

Image credit: Darryl Brooks / Shutterstock.com

With all the excitement in Atlanta, Georgia, one would think it was 1996 and the Summer Olympics were fast approaching. Not since then has the big city in the South experienced this frantic level of anticipation and excitement. No Olympics this time, but rather Super Bowl LIII. For more than 200 days, City planners and more than 10,000 volunteers have been planning, priming and preparing for just one day in February, Super Bowl Sunday, and for good reason. This year’s super football contest between the New England Patriots and the Los Angeles Rams promises to generate more than $700 billion for the city’s commerce and a welcome down payment on the costs of the city’s brand new $1.5 billion Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

The new stadium is the most recent mega landmark to grace Atlanta, which extends well beyond the confines of the original city boundaries. Mercedes-Benz Stadium is advertised to be located in the “heart of the City,” but the “City” of the Atlanta is expansive. The Atlanta Metro Area has become one of the most expansive urban Meccas in the country. With many of the world’s largest and best recognized companies deciding to call the area home, it is attracting some of the nation’s most capable young professionals and entrepreneurs who are gravitating to the area’s increasingly exciting lifestyle. The economic impact of the event will be felt throughout the expanded area and will certainly boost the fortunes of a large assortment of business and commerce.

Despite the advanced preparations and planning, residents and attendees will need to expect even more intense traffic on the city’s already frantic byways. For those not planning to participate in the many events prior to and on the day of the game, it may be a good time to consider cooking at home and staying close to the neighborhood. The areas traffic patterns have a reputation for gridlock and aggressive drivers and are legendary among residents and visitors alike, even during normal times.

Marketers are ready for the event that has redefined single-event advertising. A 30-second spot on CBS will cost advertisers about $5 million each, but there is no shortage of brands willing and ready to take a shot of making advertising history. Advertising opportunities are not the only venue for increasing brand awareness.  Billboards, Pedi cabs, vehicle wraps, experiential marketing and sampling are among the marketing collateral available to advertisers who want to connect with the anticipated 1.5 million Super Bowl LIII visitors.

For those looking to attend the Super Bowl this year, it is going to be costly for those who have not yet secured their tickets. Last available tickets for the game are rumored to cost as much as $10 thousand each. With just a few days left before Super Sunday, airline flights, hotels and passes to many of the weekend events are going for a premium. Good news for Atlanta. Who is your pick for Super Bowl stardom?