Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, However in Marketing Not Just Any Color Will Do

 

Image credit: Sergey Shenderovsky / Shutterstock.com

Are you feeling a little blue? Or perhaps you are feeling you’re in the pink? Color is frequently associated with our moods and how we feel about a topic of discussion or to elaborate on the day’s experiences. While many of these associations can be explained through personal preference, learned behavior or a result of individual culture and experience, some research studies have shown a valid correlation of color to personal motivation and behavior.  An Institute for Color Research’s study found that 92.6 percent of people surveyed said that color was the most important factor when purchasing products, and consumers’ subconscious judgment about products is influenced in 62 percent to 90 percent of cases by color alone.

Some colors can attribute the impact on behavior because of the nearly universal utilization to elicit an unchallenged response. Red, for instance, is the most commanding color of attention, perhaps due to societal utilization of the color red for everything from stop signs, fire trucks and flashing emergency lights. People have been pre-disposed to recognize and react to anything displayed red. It says, “This is important, pay attention!”  Forty-two percent more signs and advertisements are read when the color red is used, and comprehension of the message is increased as well.

Color also plays a major role in product identification. Tomato ketchup apparently is preordained to be red, in part because ripened tomatoes are mostly perceived as being red. Just ask Heinz, who discovered the public’s inherent relationship of the color red and ketchup. In an effort to excite and attract a younger consumer by making ketchup available in various colors, the marketers of fifty-seven varieties soon learned of the special relationship of red to consumers; perception of the product. Can we imagine a brown-colored Pepto Bismol?  How soothing is that perception? Marketers commonly use certain colors because those colors elicit generally accepted emotions.  While many of us react differently, most of us react in a similar way to the paring of colors to products. But there are broader messaging patterns to be found in color perceptions.

Savvy marketers of digital advertising use colors to increase conversion and click-through rates on websites. By utilizing color to differentiate call-to-action buttons or links they are driving user-consumers to take actions and improve the conversation. Understanding how design and color can work together to influence and motivate consumer behavior is a key factor to effective and efficient messaging. Studies have revealed that color can often be the sole reason someone purchases a product. In one survey, 93 percent of buyers said they focus on visual appearance, and nearly 85 percent of respondents indicated that color was a primary reason in the decision to purchase.

Customers will only respond favorably and strongly to a brand if the right color is chosen to represent that brand’s personality, culture and menu of products.  In a study titled “Impact of Color in Marketing,” researchers found that up to 90% of snap judgments made about products was based on color alone.  Research has also found that predicting consumer reaction to color appropriateness in relation to the product is far more important than the individual color, and it is extremely important that new brands specifically target logo colors that ensure differentiation from entrenched competitors.

The psychological impact of color on human behavior is neither an exact nor a settled science. But the impact of color on consumer perceptions and motivations is undeniable. So, while roses may be red and violets may be blue, in all things marketing not just any color will do.

To learn more on how color can influence purchasing behavior and enhance a brand’s identity, contact Junction Creative Solutions (Junction) at 678-686-1125.