Moms in Aprons and Ties for Dad No Longer Representative of Parents’ Special Day

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What does something homemade, dinner, and a greeting card have in common? They’re the top three things Moms want for Mother’s Day. For those who agonize every spring over selecting the perfect gift for their perfect mom, the solution seems rather simple. All we have to do is cook mom her favorite meal and hand-make her a greeting card and we all will score a bullseye with the 85.4 million mothers in the United States. Either millions of us have been overcomplicating the gift giving process or we all need a remedial course in inferential statistics.

According to the National Retail Federation (NRF), spending in 2017 around Mother’s Day hit a record $23.6 billion, and this year the upward trend is likely to continue as an estimated 86 percent of Americans celebrate the Day. Add Father’s Day to the mix, with an estimated $15.5 billion dollar consumer spend, and the parental back-to-back holidays promise a profitable opportunity to marketers who get their advertising campaigns right.

Motherhood is no longer one single stereotypical lifestyle anymore, and successful advertising campaigns reflect the diverse varieties of what being a mom means in the 21st century. The most effective campaigns are those that are unique, personalized and portray real people in real life situations in 2018. Despite the changing Mom role model, emotion and nostalgia is still playing well to this audience. Marketing campaigns that develop creative messaging that depict these new realities are those most likely to succeed.

Father’s Day advertising is taking a heartwarming and humorous approach as consumers look for different gift ideas for Dad. Americans who celebrate Father’s Day this year are expected to focus more on “special outing gifts” than ever before with nearly $3.2 billion expected to be spent on concerts, sporting events, or dinner by 47 percent of consumers. “Consumers are looking into other types of non-traditional gifts to give dads, which includes personal care, gifts of experiences, and gift cards,” says Ana Serafin Smith, director of media relations at the NRF. “Therefore, brands and retailers are modifying their Father’s Day ads to be inclusive of some of these new gift options that Millennials are looking to give during this holiday.”

Authenticity is key to successful messaging for both Parents Day events as consumers are more likely to make a purchase decision based on recognized influencers rather than a single celebrity. Like motherhood, the role of being a father is evolving in 2018.  Gifts of sporting tickets, technology toys, backyard grills and tools will remain welcome gifts for dads across America, but surveys are indicating that the best choice for father may not be a thing at all.

Special day holidays provide on-going opportunities to marketers throughout the year. Developing campaign strategies and tactics that are honest, trustworthy and reflect the values of the brand and the consumer will be well rewarded.